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Spoke 20Spoke 20

ר

Spoke 20 - Resh

Proverbs, Luke, 3 John


The Great Physician

Pleasant words are as an honeycomb, sweet to the soul, and health to the bones.

Proverbs 16:24 (Spoke 20, Cycle 1)

And he said unto them, Ye will surely say unto me this proverb, Physician, heal thyself: whatsoever we have heard done in Capernaum, do also here in thy country.

Luke 4:23 (Spoke 20, Cycle 2)

The elder unto the wellbeloved Gaius, whom I love in the truth. Beloved, I wish above all things that thou mayest prosper and be in health, even as thy soul prospereth.

3 John 1:2 (Spoke 20, Cycle 3)

Doctor Luke, whom Paul identified as the beloved physician (Colossians 4.14), is the only Gospel writer to record this famous proverb of Jesus. This unique emphasis accords with one of the primary Resh-theme words governing Spoke 20, רפא (Ropha), meaning Physician, from the triliteral root of the same spelling, rapha, meaning to heal. This then integrates with the course of World History and the Medical Miracles that marked the Twentieth Century.

This KeyWord manifests in the distribution of the idea of health and healing in the Bible. Searching the entire KJV for all occurrences of words based on heal, such as heal, healed, healest, health, and so forth, yields the following distribution:

The maximum of 33 hits occurs on Spoke 20, governed by the Letter Resh. This peak is about four times larger than the average.

The Gospel of Luke, with 27 hits, contains the absolute maximum of any book in the Bible. It is represented by the large blue bar on Spoke 20, since Luke resides on Cycle 2. The peak of 27 hits in Luke is 37% larger than the second greatest concentrations of 17 hits found in Jeremiah and Matthew.

These results confirm the ancient attribution of the the authorship of the Gospel according to Luke, the Physician. They also integrate with the Inner Cycle of Genesis, where we find the first first occurrence of the triliteral root rapha (S# H7495) in Genesis 20.

The great thematic river running through Proverbs, Luke, and 3 John carries the ideas of health, long life, and well-being that comes through wisdom, sound doctrine, and the knowledge of the truth. Thus the little book of 3 John, consisting of a mere 14 verses, is the only book on Cycle 3 of the KJV to contain the word health, which figures prominently in its opening verses:

The elder unto the wellbeloved Gaius, whom I love in the truth. Beloved, I wish above all things that thou mayest prosper and be in health, even as thy soul prospereth. For I rejoiced greatly, when the brethren came and testified of the truth that is in thee, even as thou walkest in the truth. I have no greater joy than to hear that my children walk in truth.

3 John 1ff

The emphasis upon the theme of health and prosperity is further amplified in the name Gaius (Γαιηϛ) which is phonetically related to hugies (υγιηϛ), the root of the word translated as health in the verse above. It is the root of the English hygiene.

There are four verses in the KJV that contain the words health and soul, Psalm 42 (corresponding to Luke in the Inner Cycle of the Psalms ), Psalm 43, Proverbs 16.24 and 3 John 1.2, both quoted at the head of the page. The off-Spoke occurrence in Pdsalm 43 prevents this from forming a true KeyLink, but we obviously have a very strong thematic link associated with Spoke 20 - especially in light of the tiny number of verses in 3 John:

Thematic Link: Health of thy Soul
Proverbs Psalm 42 3 John

The relation between sound doctrine and health is made explicit in the Book of Proverbs, where we read:

My son, attend to my words; incline thine ear unto my sayings. Let them not depart from thine eyes; keep them in the midst of thine heart. For they are life unto those that find them, and health to all their flesh.

Proverbs 4:20-23 (Spoke 20. Cycle 1)

And again:

My son, forget not my law; but let thine heart keep my commandments: For length of days, and long life, and peace, shall they add to thee. Let not mercy and truth forsake thee: bind them about thy neck; write them upon the table of thine heart: So shalt thou find favour and good understanding in the sight of God and man. Trust in the LORD with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths. Be not wise in thine own eyes: fear the LORD, and depart from evil. It shall be health to thy navel, and marrow to thy bones.

Proverbs 3:1-8 (Spoke 20. Cycle 1)

The correlation of the primary themes found in these three books is impossible to miss:

ProverbsHealth and long life through Wisdom, which begins with the Fear of the Lord (Prov. 9.10)
LukeThe Gospel written by the Physician, Doctor Luke, which also contains the most proverbs of any of the four Gospels.
3 JohnIt contains only 14 verses, yet opens with the prayer that "that thou mayest prosper and be in health, even as thy soul prospereth. It is the only book on Cycle 3 to even use the word health.

Insight from the Gematria Reference

My son, forget not my law; but let thine heart keep my commandments: For length of days, and long life, and peace, shall they add to thee. ... It shall be health to thy navel, and marrow to thy bones.

Proverbs 3:1,8 (Spoke 20, Cycle 1)

Examining these highlighted words from Proverbs 3.2 . 8 we find that the word translated as health is from the root rapha prefixed with the letter Mem, which is typically how Hebrew nouns (substantives) are formed from verbal roots. The exact word written is:

Health

pic

Marpe

= 321

This coincides exactly with the numerical weight of the phrase:

Length of Days

pic

Orek Yamim

= 321

We have the set:

The Number 321 Health
Length of Days

We also see the paired concepts of Infirmity and Physician (healer of infirmities) are linked by the prime Number 281:

Infirmity

pic

Asthenia

= 281 =

Physician

pic

Ropha





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