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פ

Spoke 17 - Pey

Esther, Malachi, 2 Peter


Where is the Promise of His Coming?

Knowing this first, that there shall come in the last days scoffers, walking after their own lusts, And saying, Where is the promise of his coming?

2 Peter 3 (Spoke 17, Cycle 3)

Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me: and the Lord, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the LORD of hosts.

Malachi 3 (Spoke 17, Cycle 2)

פPey KeyWords
פהPey: Mouth, Blow
פניםPanim: Face (with its associated
concept of appearance)
פתחPetach: Open, Door
פצהPetsah: Burst Open, Split
פארPa'ar: Open Wide, Gape
פררParar: Break, Crush (this is the
root of Purim)
פרץParats: Burst, Break forth

The Coming of the Lord is one of the great themes of Spoke 17. It is based on the power of Pey as expressed in the small sample of KeyWords on the right. The list could go on and on. The power of Pey is one of the most obvious of all the twenty-two letters, it crosses all linguistic boundaries, appearing even in the Oriental languages (see Pey Alphabetic Verses). The most powerful combination is in the root Pey - Resh which also is the root of Purim, the central theme of Esther, Book 17.

The meaning of Pey manifests in a Spoke 17 KeySet based on the phrase "of his coming" in proximity to the word "fire". Searching the entire Bible for all verses containing this phrase within three verses of the word "fire" yields exactly two hits, one from Malachi and one from 2 Peter on Spoke 17 of the Bible Wheel:




Malachi 3.1ff 2 Peter 3.3ff
Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me: and the Lord, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the LORD of hosts. But who may abide the day of his coming? and who shall stand when he appeareth? for he is like a refinerís fire, and like fullersí soap: And he shall sit as a refiner and purifier of silver: and he shall purify the sons of Levi, and purge them as gold and silver, that they may offer unto the LORD an offering in righteousness. Knowing this first, that there shall come in the last days scoffers, walking after their own lusts, And saying, Where is the promise of his coming? For this they willingly are ignorant of, that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of the water and in the water: Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished: But the heavens and the earth, which are now, by the same word are kept in store, reserved unto fire against the day of judgment and perdition of ungodly men.

We have the KeyLink:

keyKeyLink: The Coming of the Lord
Malachi 3chain2 Peter 3

This KeyLink exists in six of the seven versions used for comparison in this study. It is missing only in the NIV because it uses a slightly different phraseology - though the same idea is expressed. The KeyLink is actually a first-order projective KeyLink because it is two-dimensional, with the Point P(17,3) on Cycle 2 linking to the Point P(17,3) on Cycle 3. Using gnotation, we can represent this link as:

keyKeyLink: The Coming of the Lord
PBible( 172 , 3 ) chain PBible( 173 , 3 )

These linked verses form a beautiful Question and Answer doublet. The scoffers quoted in 2 Peter ask "Where is the promise of his coming?" while the Lord assures us in Malachi "Behold, he shall come, sayeth the Lord of Hosts." A similar Question and Answer fomat is displayed in the article God's Name Despised.

This theme is extremely strong. It sets Malachi and 2 Peter from all other books of the Bible, as discussed further in The Coming Day of God. It is of some interest that the modern scoffers - a.k.a. "biblical scholars" - use the unique features of 2 Peter that supernaturally link it to Malachi as evidence that the book is not genuine! The divine joke is that one of the reasons cited is that the Pey KeyWord παρουσια (parousia, coming/advent) appears three times in 2 Peter and not once in I Peter. Ha! Exactly the same kind of "logic" is applied to the Prophet Isaiah who has been sawn in half with claims of dual authorship. In both case, the claims made by God's adversaries do nothing but add yet another stone on top of the great mountain of evidence proclaiming the endless glory of God and the truth of His everlasting Word!

The integration of Malachi 3.1 with the great themes governed by the letter Pey is further seen in these three Pey KeyWords found in that one verse:

1) פנה (panah, prepare) The primary meaning of panah is to turn. It is the root of פנים (panim, face), since the face is what is seen when one turns towards another.

2) פנים (panim, before) This is the same as the word for a face.

3) פתאם (pithom, suddenly). This word is from the root פתע (petho) which Gesenius defines as deriving from "the opening of the eyes, hence, a moment."





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