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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    296

    All those A's as vowels

    In several languages
    In the English language the A in the a, b, c has a different pronounciation then in European languages. The vowel A is the letter in the European languages where we put our mouth the most open for, where the upper jaw, the heavenly-part-jaw, is the furthest away from the lower jaw. In Dutch this upper part of the mouth is called gehemelte and verhemelte, ver-hemel-te, with hemel = heaven in it (I wonder who gave it this name). And Lashon (Tongue) = 380 = Firmament (Raqiya) (Victor's finding in the 'Arc of Noah'-thread page 5). 'Arc' is a translation of 'tebah', but 'tebah' means in the first place 'word'. The word is also a sign: Ark (Tebah) = 407 = Sign (Oth) (Victor's finding in the 'Arc of Noah'-thread page 4). Remember there is a light and window build in the word, a window that opened at a certain time.

    Babies start to speak with words with many A's in it: mamma, pappa (daddy), (aap) ape. And especially the Italian language is strong with vowels and A's. Mamma mia! Chao! Here the adults speak with many A's. Israel was suppressed by them, but the Saviour, the Connector, was born there and ultimately it turned around and Rome (meaning strength), the center of all those A's and vowels, became the firmament of Christianity.

    Opposite of Italian, in Hebrew, the language which comes from 'the other side', about connection between heaven with earth, there should be as less a's as possible, as you will understand now. But in the first place however God made the distance wide. And what a coincidence, all babies start with a's as vowels, and Aleph, one, also starts with an a.

    What I am reading is the course "The Hebrew Alphabet" from the professor I like to read a lot from. Besides his info I add text where I think of myself.

    I am going to extend this subject to show why on which places the A as vowel is present. There is not necessarily an aleph at that place, but a vowel A between the consonants. The whole hebrew alphabet are considered to consist of consonants (the yod is pronounced as a vowel though, an i). The vowels like an A are seen as the life we live and therefore not written in the (original) text. There are logical places where an A-vowel is put in between the consonants and unlogical places.

    Names of God
    So we understand now about the A, it is the biggest distance between heaven and earth. The distance can be small and become bigger just like vowels.
    There is one name of God which has A's in it, that is Shaddai SHaDaI. It is translated as "Almighty", but actually it wants to express God who is the cause, the life-giver of everything, what expresses in fertility principle and plurality principle. These vowels as founding principle are therefore the distance between heaven and earth. It has to be this way, the endless of time and space is filled. These vowels as founding principle are therefore the distance between heaven and earth. In the distance between waters on the second day of creation I think of the word Raqiya with it's two a's. It is said that then the angels were created and then we can think of SaTaN with the two a's too.

    In Gen. 1 the first name of God is Elohim ELoHIM, here is the development from e to o (or oi or au) back to i. Here it opens to the i, but not so far as to the a. Here is a chance to develop too. The Bible also opens with Be. Ba'aL however (2-70-30) has only A's, the mouth is very wide open, heaven and earth are as far away from each other as possibly can. I think of the expression "having a big mouth". About Allah I don't know what to say, guess this is arabic. Although it seems that it is ELoH from ELoH-IM, but then with a's. Maybe a mixture of Elohim and Shaddai, I don't know. I try to understand grammatically but not reject. Or maybe it has to do with the word aliah (70-30-10-5) meaning something like the living place above (1 Ki. 17:19).

    The second name of God, in Gen. 2, is YHVH 10-5-6-5, we translate it with Lord. This name can not be pronounced. We also say it may not be pronounced, that is also true. All the vowels belong to every consonant of this name.

    Genesis 1:1
    Now according to my professor, the original pronounciation is not known and will probably not be accepted by thelologians. But that does not matter, it does exist. The original is:
    BEREESHIS BORO ELOHIEM ES HASCHOMAJIM WE ES HO'ORETS.
    and in the theological and Israƫlian world
    BEREESHIETH BAARAA ELOHIEM ETH HASHAMAJEM WE'ETH HA'ARETS.
    You hear the difference, it is full of A's! In the modern Hebrew the ears of my professor ached he wrote. I think it would be no good idea for him to live next to a minaret in the Middle East lol.

    Deseases
    One of the Biblical illnesses is an un-scientific disease and is not listed in books of physicians, it is called KaDaCHaTH (100-4-8-400) How it is translated, cold fever or hot fever, is not so important, but this is considered the worst disease. Can it be any worse, with all those A's? At the end of Leviticus: If you live this way then comes this and that over you, and kadachath comes over you. So this is an enormous distance between heaven and earth, a disease can be that. The deseases are classified to the distance between heaven and earth. It is another classification, not a scientific one.

    Another disease for example, translated as leper, is called in Hebrew TSoR'aTH (90-200-70-400). Again the A - A. Again the perishing. A (Biblical) disease is in fact creating a distance between heaven and earth. I'm sure you have talked to someone who meets these standaards, I sure did. Now we can see the Biblical illnesses in another light. The conclusion that it is good for our physical health, to connect as good as possible, I don't know.

    Conclusion
    So a vowel has to be something that is flexibel, there has to be a choice, it must not be something that is fixed. This way you can say MeLeCH (40-30-20), king, or MoLoCH (40-30-20), or MauLoCH (40-30-20), the vowels, that is what it is about. In Hebrew it stays M-L-CH, but the vowels are as our life in which we think and speak and write and act.

    I thought it might be interesting to let you dear reader know about. Think this information cannot be found on the internet somewhere. What do you think about it? Does it make sense to you? Did it just blow your mind? To me this is normal, I read this kind of info often, so I thought let's share some.
    Last edited by NumberX; 08-08-2010 at 04:52 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    296
    Thank you unknown reader(s) for your 5-star rating. It was a pleasure writing it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Yakima, Wa
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    14,926
    Hey there NumberX,

    Interesting ideas. It sounds like your professor speaks the Ashkenazi dialect and is projecting that back as the "original" and "true" pronunciation. Personally, I doubt that is correct. For example, he uses the Ashkenazi pronunciation of Tav as if it were a Sin in BEREESHIS and ES. That has never made any sense to me at all. What do you think about this?

    Richard
    • Skepticism is the antiseptic of the mind.
    • Remember why we debate. We have nothing to lose but the errors we hold. Who but a stubborn fool would hold to errors once they have been exposed?

    Check out my blog site

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    296
    In his books and courses he also standard writes 'bereshith' and 'bara' and 'eth' etc. You don't have to be afraid that you have to change it now, I think you may keep writing and pronouncing it like you are used to.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,046
    Quote Originally Posted by NumberX View Post
    In several languages
    In the English language the A in the a, b, c has a different pronounciation then in European languages. The vowel A is the letter in the European languages where we put our mouth the most open for, where the upper jaw, the heavenly-part-jaw, is the furthest away from the lower jaw. In Dutch this upper part of the mouth is called gehemelte and verhemelte, ver-hemel-te, with hemel = heaven in it (I wonder who gave it this name). And Lashon (Tongue) = 380 = Firmament (Raqiya) (Victor's finding in the 'Arc of Noah'-thread page 5). 'Arc' is a translation of 'tebah', but 'tebah' means in the first place 'word'. The word is also a sign: Ark (Tebah) = 407 = Sign (Oth) (Victor's finding in the 'Arc of Noah'-thread page 4). Remember there is a light and window build in the word, a window that opened at a certain time.

    Babies start to speak with words with many A's in it: mamma, pappa (daddy), (aap) ape. And especially the Italian language is strong with vowels and A's. Mamma mia! Chao! Here the adults speak with many A's. Israel was suppressed by them, but the Saviour, the Connector, was born there and ultimately it turned around and Rome (meaning strength), the center of all those A's and vowels, became the firmament of Christianity.

    Opposite of Italian, in Hebrew, the language which comes from 'the other side', about connection between heaven with earth, there should be as less a's as possible, as you will understand now. But in the first place however God made the distance wide. And what a coincidence, all babies start with a's as vowels, and Aleph, one, also starts with an a.

    What I am reading is the course "The Hebrew Alphabet" from the professor I like to read a lot from. Besides his info I add text where I think of myself.

    I am going to extend this subject to show why on which places the A as vowel is present. There is not necessarily an aleph at that place, but a vowel A between the consonants. The whole hebrew alphabet are considered to consist of consonants (the yod is pronounced as a vowel though, an i). The vowels like an A are seen as the life we live and therefore not written in the (original) text. There are logical places where an A-vowel is put in between the consonants and unlogical places.

    Names of God
    So we understand now about the A, it is the biggest distance between heaven and earth. The distance can be small and become bigger just like vowels.
    There is one name of God which has A's in it, that is Shaddai SHaDaI. It is translated as "Almighty", but actually it wants to express God who is the cause, the life-giver of everything, what expresses in fertility principle and plurality principle. These vowels as founding principle are therefore the distance between heaven and earth. It has to be this way, the endless of time and space is filled. These vowels as founding principle are therefore the distance between heaven and earth. In the distance between waters on the second day of creation I think of the word Raqiya with it's two a's. It is said that then the angels were created and then we can think of SaTaN with the two a's too.

    In Gen. 1 the first name of God is Elohim ELoHIM, here is the development from e to o (or oi or au) back to i. Here it opens to the i, but not so far as to the a. Here is a chance to develop too. The Bible also opens with Be. Ba'aL however (2-70-30) has only A's, the mouth is very wide open, heaven and earth are as far away from each other as possibly can. I think of the expression "having a big mouth". About Allah I don't know what to say, guess this is arabic. Although it seems that it is ELoH from ELoH-IM, but then with a's. Maybe a mixture of Elohim and Shaddai, I don't know. I try to understand grammatically but not reject. Or maybe it has to do with the word aliah (70-30-10-5) meaning something like the living place above (1 Ki. 17:19).

    The second name of God, in Gen. 2, is YHVH 10-5-6-5, we translate it with Lord. This name can not be pronounced. We also say it may not be pronounced, that is also true. All the vowels belong to every consonant of this name.

    Genesis 1:1
    Now according to my professor, the original pronounciation is not known and will probably not be accepted by thelologians. But that does not matter, it does exist. The original is:
    BEREESHIS BORO ELOHIEM ES HASCHOMAJIM WE ES HO'ORETS.
    and in the theological and Israƫlian world
    BEREESHIETH BAARAA ELOHIEM ETH HASHAMAJEM WE'ETH HA'ARETS.
    You hear the difference, it is full of A's! In the modern Hebrew the ears of my professor ached he wrote. I think it would be no good idea for him to live next to a minaret in the Middle East lol.

    Deseases
    One of the Biblical illnesses is an un-scientific disease and is not listed in books of physicians, it is called KaDaCHaTH (100-4-8-400) How it is translated, cold fever or hot fever, is not so important, but this is considered the worst disease. Can it be any worse, with all those A's? At the end of Leviticus: If you live this way then comes this and that over you, and kadachath comes over you. So this is an enormous distance between heaven and earth, a disease can be that. The deseases are classified to the distance between heaven and earth. It is another classification, not a scientific one.

    Another disease for example, translated as leper, is called in Hebrew TSoR'aTH (90-200-70-400). Again the A - A. Again the perishing. A (Biblical) disease is in fact creating a distance between heaven and earth. I'm sure you have talked to someone who meets these standaards, I sure did. Now we can see the Biblical illnesses in another light. The conclusion that it is good for our physical health, to connect as good as possible, I don't know.

    Conclusion
    So a vowel has to be something that is flexibel, there has to be a choice, it must not be something that is fixed. This way you can say MeLeCH (40-30-20), king, or MoLoCH (40-30-20), or MauLoCH (40-30-20), the vowels, that is what it is about. In Hebrew it stays M-L-CH, but the vowels are as our life in which we think and speak and write and act.

    I thought it might be interesting to let you dear reader know about. Think this information cannot be found on the internet somewhere. What do you think about it? Does it make sense to you? Did it just blow your mind? To me this is normal, I read this kind of info often, so I thought let's share some.
    In a language it seems that some words lose their meanings over time. Some words are not used. Take for example the thees, thys and thous and yes. I wonder if such a thing happened in Hebrew comparing Moses time with Jeremiah's time? Did they mix Hebrew with Coptic (the language of the Egyptians, was it?)? or with Chaldean? Of course they later adapted to Aramaic.

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