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The verses below list three accounts in the synoptic Gospels of the healing of the leper by Jesus, each one has its own unique variation and reflection in telling the story. Mark is well known as being the Gospel of action which moves quickly. This aspect of action shines forth distinctly in Mark from that of the other two accounts of the healing of the leaper. After the leaper is healed, Jesus tells him not to tell anyone of his healing. Luke tells us that soon the word was spread of his healing….whereas Mark tells us that the healed leaper himself goes forth and proclaims the word to many of his healing, spreading it widely abroad, amplifying the sense of 'shouting it from the housetops to the world', which is in perfect keeping with Mark’s Gospel of swift moving action.

In Mark the word he uses for beseeching is parakaleo, it is a emotionally charged word that carries the idea of imploring, or entreating, fitting well with Marks flavor of action and urgency. This is quite different from the word deomai that Luke uses, which carries more of a sense of making a request known, of a desire, or prayerful supplications. Then in Matthew an altogether different implication is drawn from the word he uses proskuneo, meaning to kneel in reverence before someone, reflecting Matthew’s theme of righteousness governed by the letter tzaddi.

Lastly, Luke’s Gospel is the only one that mentions the multitudes that came to Jesus to have their illnesses healed, what a wonderful complement that focuses on the concern of Luke the physician for the health and wellbeing of those around him.
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Matt. 8:1- 4 When he was come down from the mountain, great multitudes followed him. And, behold, there came a leper and worshipped (proskuneo) him, saying, Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean. And Jesus put forth his hand, and touched him, saying, I will; be thou clean. And immediately his leprosy was cleansed. And Jesus saith unto him, See thou tell no man; but go thy way, shew thyself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, for a testimony unto them.
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Mark 1:40-45 And there came a leper to him, imploring (parakaleo) him, and kneeling down to him, and saying unto him, If thou wilt, thou canst make me clean. And Jesus, moved with compassion, put forth his hand, and touched him, and saith unto him, I will; be thou clean. And as soon as he had spoken, immediately the leprosy departed from him, and he was cleansed. And he straitly charged him, and forthwith sent him away; And saith unto him, See thou say nothing to any man: but go thy way, shew thyself to the priest, and offer for thy cleansing those things which Moses commanded, for a testimony unto them. But he went out, and began to proclaim (kerusso) it much , and to blaze abroad (diaphemizo) the matter (logos) insomuch that Jesus could no more openly enter into the city, but was without in desert places: and they came to him from every quarter.
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Luke 5:12-15 And it came to pass, when he was in a certain city, behold a man full of leprosy: who seeing Jesus fell on his face, and requested (deomai) of him, saying, Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean. And he put forth his hand, and touched him, saying, I will: be thou clean. And immediately the leprosy departed from him. And he charged him to tell no man: but go, and shew thyself to the priest, and offer for thy cleansing, according as Moses commanded, for a testimony unto them. But soon there went there a fame abroad (logos dierchomai) of him: and great multitudes came together to hear, and to be healed by him of their infirmities.
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Rose