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Richard Amiel McGough
06-27-2007, 02:57 PM
For years I have noticed many obvious Hebrew cognates on other languages. I am working to write an article on this topic, and thought it would be helpful to have input from others as I do the research.

The most amazing, profound, and revolutionary aspect of this study is that it offers the first true understanding of the phenomenon of near universal features found in the world's languages. For example, consider the near universal root ma as described in Appendix I (http://www.bartleby.com/61/roots/IE290.html) of the American Heritage Dictionary:



Appendix I

Indo-European Roots ENTRY:mhttp://www.bartleby.com/images/pronunciation/amacr.gif-2 DEFINITION:Mother. A linguistic near-universal found in many of the world's languages, often in reduplicated form. 1. mamma2 (http://www.bartleby.com/61/80/M0068000.html), mammal (http://www.bartleby.com/61/81/M0068100.html), mammilla (http://www.bartleby.com/61/88/M0068800.html), from Latin mamma, breast. 2. Probably from this root is Greek Maia, 'good mother' (respectful form of address to old women), also nurse: Maia (http://www.bartleby.com/61/90/M0039000.html), maieutic (http://www.bartleby.com/61/8/M0040800.html); maiasaur (http://www.bartleby.com/61/90/M0039050.html). 3. mama (http://www.bartleby.com/61/73/M0067300.html), more recently formed in the same way. (Pokorny 3. mhttp://www.bartleby.com/images/pronunciation/amacr.gif 694.)
The near-universality of this root is discussed in this article (http://www.billcasselman.com/wording_room/mother.htm) from Bill Cassleman's website:


Mamma is the formal English medical word for breast. Mamma is a reduplication of the much older Proto-Indo-European root *ma, breast or mother. This is not only the first sound uttered by many human infants, it may also be the most widespread word root in the world. *Ma forms the basis of the word for mother in many different and possibly unrelated language families around the world:

Latin mater
Greek meter
French mère
German Mutter
Russian mate
Icelandic modher
Sanskrit mata
Irish mathair
Welsh mam
Arabic oum
Hebrew em
Swahili mama
Chinese ma
Hawaian makuahine (maka first, beloved < *ma-k Proto-Polynesian, the mother (?) + wahine woman)

Why so widespread a word? The sounds of m and a are among the easiest to make and among the first sounds acquired by a human infant. The first noise in life associated with deep pleasure may be the sound made by the infant’s mouth sucking milk from the mother’s breast. This sound is frequently some variant of ma-ma. The slight smacking movement of the lips made in uttering an m-sound is similar to the lip movement required to suck a nipple.
Cassleman asked "Why so widesread a word?" and then gave the standard academic answer which seems little more than an empty speculation. Try making the "smack-smack" sound of a nursing infant and see if you can hear the "ma-ma" sound. I tried it and found nothing. Of course, we can't blame the tradition-bound scholars for presenting such a lame explanation as if it were "obvious," since their assumptions have blinded them to the possibility that Hebrew could be something more than just another language that "evolved" along with the human apes. Isaac Mozeson (http://www.homestead.com/edenics/) responded to the traditional academic explanation in his entry under "mama" on page 104 of his very helpful book called "The Word: The Dictionary that Reveals the Hebrew Sources of English":


Pre-verbal children do not cry "ma" any more than they cry "wa," yet there are no "mother" terms named for the "wa" or "ba" of a baby crying to press lips (with B or W pout) to a breast.


Mozeson went on to note that the ultimate root of these mamma words is the Hebrew Em, "which signifies the 'womb' or 'origin.'" This is exactly what I published in the review of Spoke 13 (Mem) of the Bible Wheel book, reproduced online in the article called From the Waters of Judah (http://www.biblewheel.com/Wheel/Spokes/Mem_1Chronicles.asp):



Variations on the Hebrew em (mother) are nearly universal throughout the world's languages, such as ma, mama, mom, mum, em, imma, amma. This points to Hebrew as the primordial language of the whole human race because it is only in Hebrew that we see the intrinsic coherence of this mama word with the literal meaning of Mem as water and its grammatical role as the sign of the preposition from. For what is a mother but she from whom we all come? And how do we come but through water? We all floated for nine months in the amniotic sac, and when the water broke, we were born into this world.This is what I mean when I say that Hebrew offers a revolutionary understanding of the near-universals found in the language. We do not have to speculate about some hypothetical physical mechanism that "causes" nearly all babies everywhere to say "mama" - we can see that the word mama has intrinsic meaning that is derived from the Divine Language designed by God as the foundation of His Word by which He created all that is.

I am opening this thread so folks have a place to present any Hebrew cognates they find. I also want to discuss what this all means, and how it relates to the story of Babel, and how the languages could have originally been divided there, and then were transformed further under ordinary "evolution" that so enamors the modern mind.

I will begin with a few of the more obvious examples. Hebrew consonants will be written as bold capitals. I list with Strongs numbers for convenience:

==============================
Hebrew: 0817 AShaM {aw-shawm'}
Meaning: 1) guilt, offense, guiltiness

English: AShaMed: Feeling shame or guilt

==============================
Hebrew 5307 NaPhaL {naw-fal'}
Meaning: 1) to fall

English: FaLL

==============================
Hebrew 7919 SaKaL {saw-kal'}
Meaning: 1) to be prudent, be circumspect, wisely understand, prosper ...
Usage: AV - understand 12, wise 12, prosper 8, wisely 6, understanding 5, consider 4, instruct 3, prudent 2, skill 2, teach 2, misc 7; 63

English: SKiLL

It is interesting that sakal comes through almost as if it were transliterated from the Hebrew, rather than translated, in Daniel 9:22: And he informed me, and talked with me, and said, O Daniel, I am now come forth to give thee skill (sakal) and understanding.

======================================
Here is an example that Mozeson uses on the homepage of his website (http://www.homestead.com/edenics/):

4376 MaKaR {maw-kar'}
Meaning: 1) to sell

English MaRKet (verb, to sell)

Try pronouncing "mawkar market" a few times and you will hear how similar they are. This example shows how the consonants get scrambled between languages.

Well, that's sufficient for an introduction to the topic. I look forward to your contributions.

Richard

shalag
06-28-2007, 09:53 AM
You never really think of a lot of our words coming from Hebrew. I remember as a kid phrases my Dad would use - like 'Yehudi did it" or "somebody put the kabosh on that"! Are there were more.

My Dad was into crossword puzzles - and I followed suit. And then when looking into the Hebrew alef-beyt I would come across words such as 'kabosh' and find out they were actually Hebrew having the 'English' meaning. 'Kabash' (KBSh) is in the concordance actually meaning to bring into subjection or to keep under foot. And of course 'Yehudi' - the Jews - are blamed for everything.

(When I'm 'more awake' - I'll have to think about other slang words we use that are actually Hebrew.

Thanks for the post.:D

Richard Amiel McGough
06-28-2007, 10:41 AM
You never really think of a lot of our words coming from Hebrew. I remember as a kid phrases my Dad would use - like 'Yehudi did it" or "somebody put the kabosh on that"! Are there were more.

My Dad was into crossword puzzles - and I followed suit. And then when looking into the Hebrew alef-beyt I would come across words such as 'kabosh' and find out they were actually Hebrew having the 'English' meaning. 'Kabash' (KBSh) is in the concordance actually meaning to bring into subjection or to keep under foot. And of course 'Yehudi' - the Jews - are blamed for everything.

(When I'm 'more awake' - I'll have to think about other slang words we use that are actually Hebrew.

Thanks for the post.:D
Hi Shalag,

Yes, there are lot of words that have been directly imported from Hebrew, like the ones you mention. Thanks for mentioning them. But my primary interest is to find Hebrew cognates that are more "fundamental" in the sense that their meanings are connected to the meaning of the letters, and their origin can not be traced to "natural dissemination."

For example, take a look at the etymology of the word "gallows" - here is how Webster defines this word:



gal•lows \ˈga-(ˌ)lōz, -ləz, in sense 3 also -ləs\ noun

plural gallows or gal•lows•es

[Middle English galwes, plural of galwe, from Old English gealga; akin to Old Norse gelgja pole, stake, Armenian jałk twig]

(before 12th century)

1 a : a frame usually of two upright posts and a crossbeam from which criminals are hanged — called also gallows tree

b : the punishment of hanging

2 : a structure consisting of an upright frame with a crosspiece
Christ was crucified on the tree, also called the "gallows". Now look at its etymology as listed by Earnest Klein in his Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the English Language:



Gallows: ME galowes, galwes (pl.) from OE gealga, related to OS., OHG. galgo, ON. galgi, OFris galga, MHG galge, "gallows; cross" G. Galgen, "gallows", Goth galga, "cross", and to ON gelgja "pole, perch"
Look at all those related words that mean "gallows" or "cross" (of Christ). Note how many follow the pattern GLG which resembles GoLGotha, from the Hebrew GuLGuleth, the Place where Christ was crucified on the "gallows." But now get this, Klein never mentioned the connection to Golgotha! And why not? Because the tradition-bound academics have no "naturalistic mechanism" to account for the correlation. Thus, it must be a "meaningless coincidence." But the idea of "coincidence" seems a little stretched when we return to Klein and consult him again as to the origin of the English word "wheel" which he says came from the OE (Old English) hweogol (note the GL root again) and ultimately from the IE root qwe-qw'los whence the Greek kuklos, all of which follows the fundamental pattern of the Hebrew galgal (GLGL) which is cognate with gulguleth and hence Golgotha and "Gallows" as discussed above. And then it all connects to the CaLvary = skull root in Latin through the C <=> G interchange (third letters of Latin and Hebrew, of similar consonantal value). Cf Gesenius' Hebrew Dictionary for the widespread use of the GLL root in many languages. Here is a snippet:


The genuine power of this root is expressed by the Germ.rollen, which, like this, is also onomatopoetic. It is one very widely extended, imitating the noise of a globe or other round body rolled forward quickly. It is applied therefore in derivatives. [He then goes on to list many of the related words in Hebrew, Arabic, Latin, Greek, German, Dutch, etc. ... ]




Just as the real meaning of the mama words can only be understood when we look at the meaning of Mem in Hebrew, so etymological loops like this remain obscure until we understand the meaning of elements GL, GLL, and GLGL in Hebrew. This is just an outline of my basic intuition. There is much more to say, but it takes a lot of work to write it all down, which is why I started this thread. I hope it will "loosen up my fingers" and get the thoughts flowing, and that others will jump in with their own insights, like you did.

Thanks again,

Richard

Stephen
06-28-2007, 05:03 PM
The Hebrew word 'maneh' has morphed into English 'money'. Originally, maneh was a weight used for exchange purposes. The verb form is 'mawnah', meaning 'to divide, to number'. Ezekiel 45:12 is a good starting reference.

Stephen

Richard Amiel McGough
06-28-2007, 08:19 PM
The Hebrew word 'maneh' has morphed into English 'money'. Originally, maneh was a weight used for exchange purposes. The verb form is 'mawnah', meaning 'to divide, to number'. Ezekiel 45:12 is a good starting reference.

Stephen

Excellent find Stephen. It comes right through in the old King James:

KJV Ezekiel 45:12 And the shekel shall be twenty gerahs: twenty shekels, five and twenty shekels, fifteen shekels, shall be your maneh (= money).

Here's how New American Standard Hebrew-Aramaic Dictionaries defines it:

maneh (584b); from 4487; maneh, mina (a measure of weight or money):— maneh(1), minas(4).


A similar root is found transliterated in the NT:

Matthew 6:24 &#182; No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon.

Mammun is the modern Hebrew word for money. Klein traces it down to amun (in the sense of a trust, or deposit).

And that reminds me of another whole class of MN related words based on the Hebrew amen = so be it, firm, steady, trustworth, permanent, remaining, and in Greek menai = abide, remain.

Thus memory = mnemonics, what remains, etc.

This is a very rich vein.

Thanks Stephen!

Richard

Rose
06-29-2007, 11:17 PM
As I was reading a post by Stephen on another thread I noticed this....


In passing, I'm sure you are aware that the wheels spoken of in Ezekiel 1 are referred to in the original tongue as ophanim. The singular is ophan (having the significant value of 137). This word originates from the idea of revolving, and survives today in our language in the word 'open' (think "Open sesame!" and you get the picture). Moreover, ophan survives today as the root in the German word Offenbarung, which is the German name for the Book of Revelation.

Stephen

Rose

yinonyavo
07-13-2007, 12:32 PM
Hey Richard! This is actually one of the things that first got me interested in learning Hebrew. We purchased the original Noah Webster's 1864 (yr?) dictionary that was re-published about 15 years ago I think. Have you ever read the introduction Webster wrote in his original dictionary?...........It is one of the most eye-opening things I have ever read. He would turn over in his grave if he saw today's dictionary versions which carry his name. The intro is about 30 or so pages in VERY small print (in other words, practically a book in itself) where he explains how after beginning his research to write an English language dictionary, he became so convinced of the Hebrew origin of all languages, that he quit and traveled to various countries for 20 years researching that very premise before he wrote the first English dictionary. He then goes on to elaborate on several Semitic roots common to all languages and his proofs that, indeed, all languages are from either Hebrew or its unknown Semitic predecessor, whatever that might be.

From the semetic roots section: http://www.bartleby.com/61/Sroots.html

ENTRY: bkr.
DEFINITION: Common Semitic *bukur-, *bikr-, *bak(u)r-, first-born. albacore, from Arabic al-bakra, the albacore, akin to bikr, first-born, and bakr, young camel.

I started looking through my strong's and noticed how many words were so similar to the English. Webster was right! I started keeping a list which I don't have with me right now, but a few of the obvious ones I remember are:

Hebrew for 5766 עול Transliteration`evel Pronunciation eh'•vel (Key) - WICKEDNESS, EVIL

Hebrew for 5869 עין Transliteration ayin Pronunciation ah'•yin - EYE

Hebrew for 6561 פרק Transliteration paraq Pronunciation pä•rak' -BREAK

Hebrew for H1254 ברא Transliteration bara' Pronunciation bä•rä' - to cut out (PARE) - to give birth (BEAR) - to cut down (lay BARE)

Richard Amiel McGough
07-13-2007, 01:28 PM
Hey Richard! This is actually one of the things that first got me interested in learning Hebrew. We purchased the original Noah Webster's 1864 (yr?) dictionary that was re-published about 15 years ago I think. Have you ever read the introduction Webster wrote in his original dictionary?...........It is one of the most eye-opening things I have ever read. He would turn over in his grave if he saw today's dictionary versions which carry his name. The intro is about 30 or so pages in VERY small print (in other words, practically a book in itself) where he explains how after beginning his research to write an English language dictionary, he became so convinced of the Hebrew origin of all languages, that he quit and traveled to various countries for 20 years researching that very premise before he wrote the first English dictionary. He then goes on to elaborate on several Semitic roots common to all languages and his proofs that, indeed, all languages are from either Hebrew or its unknown Semitic predecessor, whatever that might be.

From the semetic roots section: http://www.bartleby.com/61/Sroots.html

ENTRY: bkr.
DEFINITION: Common Semitic *bukur-, *bikr-, *bak(u)r-, first-born. albacore, from Arabic al-bakra, the albacore, akin to bikr, first-born, and bakr, young camel.

I started looking through my strong's and noticed how many words were so similar to the English. Webster was right! I started keeping a list which I don't have with me right now, but a few of the obvious ones I remember are:

Hebrew for 5766 עול Transliteration`evel Pronunciation eh'•vel (Key) - WICKEDNESS, EVIL

Hebrew for 5869 עין Transliteration ayin Pronunciation ah'•yin - EYE

Hebrew for 6561 פרק Transliteration paraq Pronunciation pä•rak' -BREAK

Hebrew for H1254 ברא Transliteration bara' Pronunciation bä•rä' - to cut out (PARE) - to give birth (BEAR) - to cut down (lay BARE)
Hey there Yinonyavo!

Wow! What an excellent post! I heard about Websters dictionary being republished some years ago - it was very big amongst the homeschoolers. And I knew that he had done a lot on Hebrew roots, so I really wanted to get one, but never did. I'm definitely going to get one.

One of the first clues for me about the Hebrew roots in English was the root damam which means dumb

1826 damam {daw-man'}
Meaning: 1) to be silent, be still, wait, be dumb, grow dumb

It is a fundamental Dalet Keyword, and it first appears in the sequence of Psalms in quite memorably in Psalm 4:4 (http://www.biblewheel.com/InnerWheels/Psalms/Psalm04.asp). This root has always been one of my "test cases" that I use to discern the level of anti-Hebrew prejudice (or simple ignorance) when evaluating an etymological dictionary.

Richard

PS: Your observation concerning the root PaRaK = BReaK is extremely wide spread. I've written about this in a few places on the site. Here is a snippet from my article on Pey KeyWords found here (http://www.biblewheel.com/Wheel/Spokes/Peh_AV.asp):


The Pey-Resh Root
Noting that the plosives p and b are interchangable, as are the dental/fricatives t,d,z, we behold the universal manifestation of the power of Pey throughout the Western Asiatic languages. Here are some really obvious cognates - the Hebrew Pey + Resh + Dental/Fricative pattern:

(S# 6331) Pur = Break, Crush (root of Purim (http://www.biblewheel.com/forum/../Wheel/Spokes/Peh_Purim.asp))
(S# 6504) Parad = Break through, divide, part, separate
(S# 6555) Paratz = Burst
(S# 6578) Parat = Rushing forth
(S# 6566) Paras = Break, chop in pieces, scatter

Stephen
07-13-2007, 03:40 PM
Hi folks!

Some of the Hebrew words used for the breastplate stones at Exodus 28 survive today in English. These are the stone names in question.

The second breastplate stone is the Hebrew pitedah. This stone is without doubt our modern peridot, pronounced in almost exactly the same way as the ancient Hebrew word for the same stone. Note that the second letter in the Hebrew name is the teth. This letter is named after a rolling or twisting, hence it is often identified as a pictogram of a snake. The rolled 'r' sound often becomes a 't' on many tongues, and vice versa.

The third breastplate stone is the Hebrew bareqeth. This word comes down to us in English through the etymological chain bareqeth - marakata - maragdos - smaragdos - smaraldus - esmeralde - emerald. This association is well-known.

The fifth stone is the Hebrew sappir. In Greek, this word becomes sappheiros, the root of our word sapphire. The ancient sappheiros is, however, known today as lapis lazuli. Our modern sapphire was known anciently as huakinthos.

The ninth breastplate stone is the Hebrew achlamah. I believe this stone to be our modern aquamarine, which word I believe to be derived directly from the Hebrew. The assumption has always been that aquamarine derives from the Latin aqua and mare. This has been traced back no earlier than the 15th century. I believe this latter to be merely a secondary derivation, the Hebrew being the primary etymology.

Finally, the twelfth breastplate stone is the Hebrew yashepheh, which translates to our modern jasper. The breastplate jasper would have been a yellow or clear form of jasper.

Stephen

Richard Amiel McGough
07-13-2007, 07:27 PM
The fifth stone is the Hebrew sappir. In Greek, this word becomes sappheiros, the root of our word sapphire. The ancient sappheiros is, however, known today as lapis lazuli. Our modern sapphire was known anciently as huakinthos.
Stephen
Hi Stephen

Good list! I noticed that one about the saphire a long time ago - to obvious to miss.

And it just reminded me about the root of "sparrow" ... Remember Zipporah, Moses wife? Well, her name means ZiPoRaH => SiPoRaH => SPaRrow. Here's Strong's entry:

6833 tsippowr {tsip-pore'} or tsippor {tsip-pore'}
Meaning: 1) bird, fowl 1a) bird (singular) 1b) birds (coll)
Origin: from 06852; TWOT - 1959a; n f
Usage: AV - bird 32, fowl 6, sparrow 2; 40

And here's an example from the KJV where the translator needed to do little but transliterate:

Psalm 84:3 Yea, the sparrow (tzippor) hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O LORD of hosts, my King, and my God.

Richard

Stephen
07-14-2007, 07:13 PM
Finding Hebrew roots alive in modern English is too easy. Here's an example. I open my Gesenius lexicon and look at the first word I see. It is the verb 'awnan' - ayin-nun-nun - meaning 'to cover'. We have the word awning in English, which has the same basic meaning.

I then peer across at the next column. The first word I see is the verb 'awneq' - ayin-nun-qoph - meaning 'to adorn the neck'. The English word neck is found in this Hebrew root.

Linguists deliberately ignore the close association of English with Hebrew. I would submit that it is a political ploy. Be that as it may, it does beg the question of why there are so many Hebrew roots alive today in English and related languages. Could it be an indicator of where the exiled ten tribes of the house of Israel eventually ended up? In Great Britain?

Stephen

Stephen
08-02-2007, 02:14 AM
Evening All!

Following up a suggestion from Richard over at post #137 of the Rapture thread, here's a little bit concerning the roots of the English word 'harvest', and its derivation from the Hebrew h-r-p structure.

The origins of the word 'harvest' are to be found in the Hebrew verb charaph, meaning 'to gather, to pluck off'. This verb gives rise to the Hebrew noun choreph, meaning 'autumn'. Of course, autumn is the time of harvest, which in German is Herbst. Related words include the English 'herb', and also the verbs 'carp' and 'crop'. Other verbs related to this root seem to include 'grip', 'grope' and 'grab'; and possibly even the nouns 'grapes' and 'harp', as things that are plucked. These are variations on the primary etym, which is the r-p structure. From this come words like 'rip', 'ripe', 'reap' and 'rape'. I'm sure others could find more English words from this h-r-p structure.

For further reading, check out posts #134 and #135 of the Rapture thread, and Gesenius' comments on the word charaph, which can be found online at Blue Letter Bible.

Stephen

Geoffrey
08-10-2007, 02:24 PM
Hallo Richard,

You probably already have this cognate, if it is one:

a-b-o-d-e and b-e-y-t

Richard Amiel McGough
08-10-2007, 02:42 PM
Hallo Richard,

You probably already have this cognate, if it is one:

a-b-o-d-e and b-e-y-t
Hi Geoffrey,

No, I hadn't thought of that one. Most etymologists trace "abode" down to "bide" and ultimately the verb "bid." Mozeson follows this path and links it to batah (Bet Tet Aleph or Bet Tet Hey) which means "to utter" or "express." In this sense it is related to the symbolic meaning of Bet as Word. I would tend in that direction more than Bayit (House) because of the verbal root of abide.

Thanks for the input.

Richard

Stephen
08-10-2007, 11:59 PM
Gents!

Since Geoffrey is from South Africa, perhaps he might relate to this Hebrew root. The Afrikaaner word 'trek', which we have adopted into English, comes directly from the Hebrew noun derek, meaning 'a way; path'. This Hebrew noun comes from the verb form darach, having the same triliteral form, which means 'to tread on'. From this triliteral root come various English words such as 'track', 'direct' and 'dragon'.

Stephen

Richard Amiel McGough
08-11-2007, 12:05 AM
Gents!

Since Geoffrey is from South Africa, perhaps he might relate to this Hebrew root. The Afrikaaner word 'trek', which we have adopted into English, comes directly from the Hebrew noun derek, meaning 'a way; path'. This Hebrew noun comes from the verb form darach, having the same triliteral form, which means 'to tread on'. From this triliteral root come various English words such as 'track', 'direct' and 'dragon'.

Stephen

Hey there Stephen!

Yes, the "DRK" root is very strong. I noticed the "direction" link long ago, but the "trek" had slipped past me. Good find!

I don't know about the "dragon" connection ... I'll have to think about that one.

Richard

Stephen
08-11-2007, 12:55 AM
Good afternoon, Richard!

The 'dragon' one is far more interesting than the others. Note that it has the diminutive suffix -on. This is found in many Hebrew names, such as Zebulun, Jeduthun, Simeon etc. Many Greek names exhibit this same property, strongly suggesting an interaction between cultures, probably through trade. The Phoenicians - who may well have been Israelites - are said by the Greeks to have given them the alphabet.

'Dragon', in its etymological sense, is originally a referent to a large serpent. We see this, for example, in the ancient Greek name of the constellation Draco, which is in the form of a serpent. The more familiar basilisk dragon came a little later.

The truest traces of the origin of the meaning of the word 'dragon' actually come from Genesis. At chapter 49, verse 17, we read Don nachash derek, "Dan is a serpent in the path". The symbol of a serpent is combined with the root derek in this passage, which is the original signification of what a dragon was. Of especial interest is that this very symbol survives today in the U.S. First Navy Jack. The word derek comes from the verb form meaning 'to tread on'. The original dragon was a large serpent that you most definitely did not want to tread on!

Traces of the serpent as symbolic of a path - a way trodden - are perhaps to be found in the serpent that Benjamin Franklin famously used to represent the thirteen colonies that became America. Certainly, the idea of a path being symbolised by a snake is very old, and common to poetic language even today. This is especially true of a winding path.

Referring back to the tribe of Dan, it is also interesting that they carried the brigade emblem - Hebrew degel - of the Eagle. Their own personal tribal ensign - Hebrew owth - was, as we saw, a serpent. The basilisk form of the dragon, which postdates the original serpent dragon form, can be seen as a hybrid of the serpent and the eagle. I once lived in Basel, Switzerland, where the basilisk was an important emblem.

The point that I really want to emphasise is that the original dragon was a serpent, and not the basilisk form of which we are more familiar these days. Also, this original dragon got its name from the fact that it was symbolic of a pathway, a trodden way, hence the Hebrew root of the word.

Stephen

Richard Amiel McGough
08-11-2007, 03:50 PM
Good afternoon, Richard!

The 'dragon' one is far more interesting than the others. Note that it has the diminutive suffix -on. This is found in many Hebrew names, such as Zebulun, Jeduthun, Simeon etc. Many Greek names exhibit this same property, strongly suggesting an interaction between cultures, probably through trade. The Phoenicians - who may well have been Israelites - are said by the Greeks to have given them the alphabet.
Hey ho Stephen!

Are you sure about the "Nun sofit" being a diminutive? I haven't noticed that in Hebrew, though it may be something found in Yiddish.

The actual grammatical function of Nun is quite fascinating. It is called the "agential suffix" because it is used to indicate an agent that performs an action. I wrote about this for the Bible Wheel book but it didn't make it into the final edit. Here is what I wrote:


The grammatical function of Nun also exemplifies its meaning as perpetuity and continuity. It is an agential suffix which means that Nun is suffixed to a verb to form the name of the agent continually performing the action described by the verb. Earnest Klein, in his Exhaustive Etymological Dictionary of the Hebrew Language, explains this as the difference between 'one who performs an action incidentally' verses a 'permanent occupation or profession.' Rabbi Munk agrees, and describes the difference as that between 'an occasional and habitual quality.' He then gives a number of examples such as sheker (one who occasionally lies) versus shakron (a habitual liar), and zeker (memorial) versus zikron (eternal commemoration). This meaning of Nun manifests with great clarity in the Book of Hebrews, as seen in this list of words from that Book relating to continuance, endurance, faith and faithfulness (repeat occurrences in parentheses):

confidence (3), confirmation, confirmed (2), continually (3), continue (2), continued, continueth, continuing, daily (3), endure (2), endured (5), enduring, established, eternal (5), faith (32), faithful (4), for ever (9), for evermore, foundation (4), hold fast (3), immutable, immutabil-ity, often (2), oftentimes, patience (3), patiently, remain, remainest, remaineth (2), rest (10), stedfast (3), sure, surety, unchangeable
This list contains over one hundred occurrences of words exemplifying the symbolic mean-ing of the Fourteenth Letter as taught in Scripture and recognized for thousands of years in Rabbinic tradition. Just as we saw the meaning of Gimel exemplified by a large set of asso-ciated words in 2 Corinthians on Spoke 3 (pg ), so now we see exactly the same phenomenon with regards to the meaning of Nun in Hebrews on Spoke 14.


And while I am here, I should mention that I was reading Judges 7:7 today and noticed the word laqaq means lick, another extremely obvious cognate, which also is onomatopoetic:


לקק laqaq {law-kak'} a primitive root; TWOT - 1126;
v AV - lap 4, lick 3; 7 1) to lap, lick, lap up 1a) (Qal) to lap, lap up 1b) (Piel) to lap up


Richard

Stephen
08-11-2007, 09:05 PM
Hello Richard!

I wonder if hello is related to halal. There is a certain resonance between the meanings of the Hebrew word and our cheerful form of greeting.

Another correspondence seems to exist between halak and 'walk'. Surely this cannot be coincidence. Next in the lexicon comes hal'm, the meaning of which is congruent with our word 'harm'. Which reminds me of the correspondence between chalam and 'calm'. Another onomatopoeic one is hamah, meaning 'hum'. It seems to go on and on, suggesting that there is a link between the English and the Israelites. Worth following that thought, Richard. After all, even the name of the language we speak is very probably straight from Hebrew. 'English' is consonant with the Hebrew dialectic root englah, which means 'bullock'. The englah was an appellation for Ephraim (Hosea 10:11). England is symbolised by John Bull, and famed for its bulldog fighting spirit. Of course, the suffix -ish is simply Hebrew for 'man'.

Stephen

Richard Amiel McGough
08-14-2007, 05:27 PM
Hello Richard!

I wonder if hello is related to halal. There is a certain resonance between the meanings of the Hebrew word and our cheerful form of greeting.
Hey ho Stephen,,

I don't have anything certain on "hello" but my first guess would be that it is a variation on "hail" which means "healthy, whole, sound" and this makes me think of the Hebrew chayil, though it is not an exact match:

חיל chayil {khah'-yil} from 02342; TWOT - 624a; n m AV - army 56, man of valour 37, host 29, forces 14, valiant 13, strength 12, riches 11, wealth 10, power 9, substance 8, might 6, strong 5, misc 33; 243 1) strength, might, efficiency, wealth, army 1a) strength 1b) ability, efficiency 1c) wealth 1d) force, army


Another correspondence seems to exist between halak and 'walk'. Surely this cannot be coincidence.
I noticed this one years ago, and consider it a very solid example of an English/Hebrew cognate. It is very interesting that it also links to the galal root (Gimel Lamed Lamed) = to roll, hence galgal = wheel, and these phonemes have this power (whether with Kaph or Gimel, and with a liguid Resh/Lamed interchange) throughout many languages. E.g. circle, kuklos, kirkos, etc.


Next in the lexicon comes hal'm, the meaning of which is congruent with our word 'harm'. Which reminds me of the correspondence between chalam and 'calm'.
I don't know what word you mean by "chalam." Could you spell it in Hebrew? As for "calm" - I have wondered if it might not link to salam with the sibilant "c" as in "cereal." I just checked Klein's Etymological Dictionary of the English Language, and he traced it down to the Greek chauma which he says means "the burning heat of the sun" which is curious since that is the meaning of the Hebrew Cham, which he knew since he also wrote a Hebrew Etymological dictionary (but stayed entirely within the academic herd and never once suggested any connections with Hebrew except when absolutely necessary as with words like "amen"). He then went on to say that chauma was from the Indo-European root chaien = to burn, whence such words as "caustic" and chomage. In none of this series of words connected with heat and burning did he ever mention this fundamental Hebrew root:



חמם chamam {khaw-mam'} a primitive root; TWOT- 677; v AV - ...warm 7, ...hot 3, ...heat 2 enflaming 1; 13 1) to be hot, become warm 1a) (Qal) 1a1) to be or grow warm 1a2) of passion (fig.) 1b) (Niphal) to become aroused, inflame oneself with 1c) (Piel) to warm 1d) (Hithpael) to warm oneself

And while we are chatting about this part of the dictionary, have you consided the root chamas = violence? Its usually spelt with an "h" as in the name of that wicked terrorist group Hamas. This links directly to the Sanscrit ahimsa = a (no) hamas (violence).


Another onomatopoeic one is hamah, meaning 'hum'. It seems to go on and on, suggesting that there is a link between the English and the Israelites. Worth following that thought, Richard. After all, even the name of the language we speak is very probably straight from Hebrew. 'English' is consonant with the Hebrew dialectic root englah, which means 'bullock'. The englah was an appellation for Ephraim (Hosea 10:11). England is symbolised by John Bull, and famed for its bulldog fighting spirit. Of course, the suffix -ish is simply Hebrew for 'man'.

Stephen

I think you crossed the border on your last set of associations. I'm not familiar with any Hebrew word hamah that means "hum." How is it spelt? Although Tehum has been associated with "hum" so maybe I forgot something. But we are talking about world-wide linguistic patterns, not just English and Hebrew. For example, I just showed there is an obvious link between the Greek chauma (heat) and the Hebrew cham, but we do not use that to infer that the Greeks are Hebrews, do we?

As for the "ish" suffix. We know that it is an "adjective suffix" that means "like" or "of the quality of" or "pertaining to." It is very much like the adjective suffix "i" or "y", which by they way, are Hebraic, as in "Israeli." But it does not mean "Aish" as in "man." To think otherwise would be foolish.

Richard

Stephen
08-14-2007, 06:12 PM
Hi Richard!

The lack of Hebrew fonts makes life a bit more difficult, but here's some clarification on some of the roots. The word chalam means 'to dream'. It is the root for the stone achlamah, meaning 'dream stone', which I believe to be the aquamarine. You'd spell it cheth - lamed - mem. The Hebrew chalam is much more likely to be the root of 'calm' than Klein's etymology. But as you say, he hung with the academic herd. The chalam concepts integrate easier with the English.

He - mem - he is hamah, meaning 'to hum'. The hum of a harp being played, that kind of thing. And yes, I was aware of the root hamas and its current equivalence to Hamas in Palestine; and the gl cluster and its variants that produce many words. But the hayil one was new to me. Very 20th century Germanic! But then, German has a lot in common with Hebrew and English. I also like your take on tehum. That word always strikes me as having the qualities of deep resonance.

Yes, the englah association with the English is controversial, but ... it's not an isolated case! That's where it starts to shake the apples from the tree. There are further basic appellations in the British Isles that similarly have Hebraic roots. The name Brit for the British is also straight out Hebrew. It is the word beth - resh - yod - tav, transliterating as B-R-I-T, and means 'covenant'. And how about the name Scot for the Scots? The word Scot means 'wanderer', and is the same as the Hebrew samekh - kaph - vav - tav, which transliterates as S-C-O-T, and in our Bibles appears as Succoth, or booths. It will be recalled that succoth, both as booths and the Festival of Booths, commemorated Israel's time as wanderers. Moreover, if you go to the biblical account at Judges 8:14-16, you'll see that the elders of the town of Succoth were upbraided by Gideon with thistles. This is the emblem of the Scots to this very day. It seems they learnt their lesson! Interestingly, Scotland is the only country in the world that has a town by the name of Succoth. It's in the old part of the country, too, in the west, where the Irish Scots made their initial incursions into Scotland.

Now that should be food for thought!

Stephen

Richard Amiel McGough
08-14-2007, 10:43 PM
Hi Richard!

The lack of Hebrew fonts makes life a bit more difficult, but here's some clarification on some of the roots. The word chalam means 'to dream'. It is the root for the stone achlamah, meaning 'dream stone', which I believe to be the aquamarine. You'd spell it cheth - lamed - mem. The Hebrew chalam is much more likely to be the root of 'calm' than Klein's etymology. But as you say, he hung with the academic herd. The chalam concepts integrate easier with the English.
I was guessing you meant chalam (to dream) but I didn't see any obvious connection with "calm" ... and I still don't. What is the connection between "dream" and "calm?"


He - mem - he is hamah, meaning 'to hum'. The hum of a harp being played, that kind of thing.
I do think there is a connection, but it needs to be remembered that the "hum" is not so much like a harp really. The word "hamah" is used only once in relation to a "harp" and the way it is used is not in the way we would speak of the "hum" of a "harp":

Isaiah 16:11 Wherefore my bowels shall sound (hamah) like an harp for Moab, and mine inward parts for Kirharesh.

The actual root has a very violent sense, and is associated with the roar of a restless sea, or mob of people:


המה hamah {haw-maw'} a primitive root [compare 01949]; TWOT - 505; v AV - roar 8, noise 6, disquieted 4, sound 3, troubled 2, aloud 1, loud 1, clamorous 1, concourse 1, mourning 1, moved 1, raged 1, raging 1, tumult 1, tumultuous 1, uproar 1; 34 1) to murmur, growl, roar, cry aloud, mourn, rage, sound, make noise, tumult, be clamorous, be disquieted, be loud, be moved, be troubled, be in an uproar 1a) (Qal) 1a1) to growl 1a2) to murmur (fig. of a soul in prayer) 1a3) to roar 1a4) to be in a stir, be in a commotion 1a5) to be boisterous, be turbulent


But I do think this relates to the English "hum" since both are onomatopoetic.


And yes, I was aware of the root hamas and its current equivalence to Hamas in Palestine; and the gl cluster and its variants that produce many words. But the hayil one was new to me. Very 20th century Germanic! But then, German has a lot in common with Hebrew and English. I also like your take on tehum. That word always strikes me as having the qualities of deep resonance.
Looks like we are tracking pretty well here.


Yes, the englah association with the English is controversial, but ... it's not an isolated case! That's where it starts to shake the apples from the tree. There are further basic appellations in the British Isles that similarly have Hebraic roots. The name Brit for the British is also straight out Hebrew. It is the word beth - resh - yod - tav, transliterating as B-R-I-T, and means 'covenant'. ]
I've noticed the phonetic similarity, of course, but do you have any basis for a semanitc similarity? Is the idea of "covenant" strongly characteristic of the Brits?


And how about the name Scot for the Scots? The word Scot means 'wanderer', and is the same as the Hebrew samekh - kaph - vav - tav, which transliterates as S-C-O-T, and in our Bibles appears as Succoth, or booths. It will be recalled that succoth, both as booths and the Festival of Booths, commemorated Israel's time as wanderers.
It is interesting that the word "Succoth" is introduced in Gen 33:17 with the words "And Jacob journeyed to Succoth." But I definitely will need more evidence than that. Where did you get the definition of Scots as "wanderer?"


Moreover, if you go to the biblical account at Judges 8:14-16, you'll see that the elders of the town of Succoth were upbraided by Gideon with thistles. This is the emblem of the Scots to this very day. It seems they learnt their lesson! Interestingly, Scotland is the only country in the world that has a town by the name of Succoth. It's in the old part of the country, too, in the west, where the Irish Scots made their initial incursions into Scotland.

Now that should be food for thought!

Stephen

Well now, that last association really is rather intriguing. I checked, and yes indeed, there is a Succoth, Scotland.


Richard

Stephen
08-15-2007, 12:07 AM
Hi Richard!

You certainly do have a good command of etymological roots. By that I mean you are able to go beyond the lexicons etc, and really think about the roots.

You are correct with your correction of hamah, and also with your conclusion that it relates onomatopoetically to hum. Also, I don't support the idea that Ephesus has a Hebrew root, but it's interesting nonetheless for comparison's sake.

Concerning the root brit as it relates to the Brits, this word is much more inclusive than the appellation English, which latter only includes those from England. Brits were first the Welsh and the English, but when James VI of the Scots acceded to the throne to become James I of Great Britain - the same king who commissioned the King James Bible - the appellation Brits extended to include Scots. Today a Brit will be more than peeved if you call him an Englishman and he's not English! Always use the word Brit. It's definitely a sign of their covenant!
Concerning covenant, the Union Jack is very much a covenant of union between the different nations that form the United Kingdom. That includes those from Northern Ireland. And you really want to check out that Northern Ireland flag, with the red hand and the star of David. Ancient memories of Genesis 38 surviving through legend and symbol????? They even got the colours right, red and white!

I read somewhere way back that the Welsh to this day bake a special type of bread which is called the Bread of the Covenant. I will have to find a source for that information. My mum has a Welsh friend, I might email her to get some more info. What is certain is that they sing the hymn 'Bread of Heaven' almost as a second national anthem.
Speaking more of the Welsh, many linguists have noted the strong similarities between their language and ancient Hebrew. They call themselves beath cymru, the House of Cymru (pronounced 'khumree'). They are a nation of singers, and truly are the hymnists of the world. One set of words always strikes me when they sing their beautiful national anthem, which in English translates as 'Land of My Fathers'. That set of words is Gwlad, Gwlad. I always think of the biblical Gilead when they cry those words, as the words are pronounced the same.

Concerning the appellation Scots meaning 'wanderers', this can partly be traced to lines in Latin carved into a chunk of wood that was once attached to the coronation stone, which Edward I carried off to Westminster Abbey in 1296:
Ni fallet fatum Scoti hunc quocunque locatum
Invenient lapidem regnare tenentur ibidem.
These lines have been famously translated by Walter Scott as:
Unless the fates be faithless grown, or prophet's voice be vain
Where'er is found this sacred stone, the wanderer's race shall reign.
The terms Scot and wanderer were seen to be interchangeable. Indeed, the Scots, in the Declaration of Arbroath of 1320, count their origins from the going out of the children of Israel!

Anyway, this thread is not really intended for history lessons, so I'll let it get :focus:

Stephen

Richard Amiel McGough
08-15-2007, 10:23 AM
Concerning the root brit as it relates to the Brits, this word is much more inclusive than the appellation English, which latter only includes those from England. Brits were first the Welsh and the English, but when James VI of the Scots acceded to the throne to become James I of Great Britain - the same king who commissioned the King James Bible - the appellation Brits extended to include Scots. Today a Brit will be more than peeved if you call him an Englishman and he's not English! Always use the word Brit. It's definitely a sign of their covenant!
Concerning covenant, the Union Jack is very much a covenant of union between the different nations that form the United Kingdom. That includes those from Northern Ireland. And you really want to check out that Northern Ireland flag, with the red hand and the star of David. Ancient memories of Genesis 38 surviving through legend and symbol????? They even got the colours right, red and white!
Yes, the Brits are a "covenant" people, but that "covenant" came many years after the name "Britannia" originated sometime between 300 and 55 BC. Do you think this might be a problem with your theory?


I read somewhere way back that the Welsh to this day bake a special type of bread which is called the Bread of the Covenant. I will have to find a source for that information. My mum has a Welsh friend, I might email her to get some more info.
Yes, it would be good to find more info, but the problem is that most people groups are formed on the basis of some kind of "covenant" - so finding the same thing with the Brits doesn't seem significant.


What is certain is that they sing the hymn 'Bread of Heaven' almost as a second national anthem.
That's to be expected amongst Christian folk. I kinda get the impression you overlook the fact that the Hebrew influence came via the OT of the Christian Bible. Do you have anything in your methodology to distinguish between Herbraic images and motifs derived from Gentiles who converted to Christianity as opposed to direct descent via the lost tribes of Israel?


Speaking more of the Welsh, many linguists have noted the strong similarities between their language and ancient Hebrew. They call themselves beath cymru, the House of Cymru (pronounced 'khumree'). They are a nation of singers, and truly are the hymnists of the world. One set of words always strikes me when they sing their beautiful national anthem, which in English translates as 'Land of My Fathers'. That set of words is Gwlad, Gwlad. I always think of the biblical Gilead when they cry those words, as the words are pronounced the same.
Those are some very interesting links. Are you saying the the Welsh word for house is Beath? What other cognates are there? How broad is the scholastic acceptance of the Hebrew roots of Welsh?

I've also read that some Native American languages are very similar to Hebrew, but I have not confirmed it yet.

BTW - have you noticed that the male/female suffixes -O and -A in the Romance languages mimic the Hebrew male/female possessive suffixes?

beyto = his house, beytah = her house.


Concerning the appellation Scots meaning 'wanderers', this can partly be traced to lines in Latin carved into a chunk of wood that was once attached to the coronation stone, which Edward I carried off to Westminster Abbey in 1296:
Ni fallet fatum Scoti hunc quocunque locatum
Invenient lapidem regnare tenentur ibidem.
These lines have been famously translated by Walter Scott as:
Unless the fates be faithless grown, or prophet's voice be vain
Where'er is found this sacred stone, the wanderer's race shall reign.
The terms Scot and wanderer were seen to be interchangeable. Indeed, the Scots, in the Declaration of Arbroath of 1320, count their origins from the going out of the children of Israel!

Anyway, this thread is not really intended for history lessons, so I'll let it get :focus:

Stephen

I think we need to make a thread to discuss this in ... it looks very interesting. Or since it involves so many Hebrew cognates, we could just continue here.

I checked out the Declaration of Arbroath, and you are correct, they mentioned the Exodus but there is no suggestion that they identified themselves as Israelis.

Richard

Stephen
08-15-2007, 09:05 PM
Hey there, dude!

Y' know yer askin' me t' write a book wiv all these pesky questions o' yers, dontcha boy?! If only I had enough hours in the day and brain cells left in my skull to do justice to this subject.

No sweat tho, bro. All these questions you ask I've asked myself many times. Every objection you've made is entirely valid, and most of 'em don't have a direct answer. Sorry 'bout that, but that's just the way it is with history antecedent to the printing press. Even in this postmodern (or post-postmodern to some theoretical gurus) era we are seeing histories rapidly repackaged and inflected, often within a day of an event's occurrence. What chance of our times ever being accurately retold in the ages to come? Today we have way too much data to dig through, whereas in the ancient world there's way too little data to dig through.

This is not a cop out, though. Sifting through academic opinion re history is not something I am qualified to do. However, when it comes to biblical history, there are many more clues than just names and events. The Bible uses symbols for peoples, tribes and nations. We do the same thing today, with our heraldic devices, our coats-of-arms and our flags. These symbols meant a lot more than written script to ancient peoples, because it is almost certain that very few people were actually literate. Sleuthing through these symbols to uncover meaning is always going to produce contestable findings. That's unavoidable. But it's necessary.

Believe me, all your objections are noted. For me, the weight of evidence rather than its quality sways me. There's just too much that fits to dismiss everything as coincidence. I mean, this very thread itself is but one thread in the total weight of evidence. And, of course, the linguistic community would outright dismiss the content of this thread as mere coincidence. It is just not in fashion to think that English could possibly have many Hebraic roots.

At the end of the day I think this entire subject, Hebrew roots in modern English - and the subsequent conclusions I have reached, which you quite fairly contest - is one that you just have to decide for yourself. For me, in spite of the circumstantial nature of most of the evidence, there's just too much of it for it to be coincidence - and I'm talking much more than just linguistic theory here. And the real acid test is that it doesn't have to be force-fitted into Scripture. It actually helps to explain Scripture. That's the wood, though I most certainly can't qualify all of the trees.

Stephen

Richard Amiel McGough
08-20-2007, 10:49 AM
Here is one that I have known for many years, but was just reminded about it as I was reading an article (http://prophecycodebook.com/excerpts.htm) on Code Breaker's site where he mentioned that the English word "evil" is from the Hebrew "evel" (Strong's #5766)


עול `evel {eh'-vel} or עול `avel {aw'-vel} and (fem.) עולה `avlah {av-law'} or `owlah {o-law'} or `olah {o-law'} from 05765; TWOT - 1580a,1580b; n m/f
AV - iniquity 36, wickedness 7, unrighteousness 3, unjust 2, perverseness 1, unjustly 1, unrighteously 1, wicked 1, wickedly 1, variant 2; 55 1) injustice, unrighteousness, wrong 1a) violent deeds of injustice 1b) injustice (of speech) 1c) injustice (generally)I checked with Klein's Etymological Dictionary of English, and he listed a dozen cognates in all the Indo-European languages, and ultimately traced it to the idea of "going up" or "going over" in the sense of "transgression." This is very interesting, because that is the fundamental meaning of the Hebrew root Ayin Lamed which spells "evel" when a Vav is inserted:


עלה `alah {aw-law'} a primitive root; TWOT - 1624; v AV - (come, etc...) up 676, offer 67, come 22, bring 18, ascend 15, go 12, chew 9, offering 8, light 6, increase 4, burn 3, depart 3, put 3, spring 2, raised 2, arose 2, break 2, exalted 2, misc 33; 889 1) to go up, ascend, climb 1a) (Qal) 1a1) to go up, ascend 1a2) to meet, visit, follow, depart, withdraw, retreat 1a3) to go up, come up (of animals) 1a4) to spring up, grow, shoot forth (of vegetation) 1a5) to go up, go up over, rise (of natural phenomenon) 1a6) to come up (before God) 1a7) to go up, go up over, extend (of boundary) 1a8) to excel, be superior to 1b) (Niphal) 1b1) to be taken up, be brought up, be taken away 1b2) to take oneself away 1b3) to be exalted 1c) (Hiphil) 1c1) to bring up, cause to ascend or climb, cause to go up 1c2) to bring up, bring against, take away 1c3) to bring up, draw up, train 1c4) to cause to ascend 1c5) to rouse, stir up (mentally) 1c6) to offer, bring up (of gifts) 1c7) to exalt 1c8) to cause to ascend, offer 1d) (Hophal) 1d1) to be carried away, be led up 1d2) to be taken up into, be inserted in 1d3) to be offered 1e) (Hithpael) to lift oneselfThis is the word that describes Satan's primary evil desire to ascend to the throne of God:


KJV Isaiah 14:14 I will ascend above (e'eleh al) the heights of the clouds; I will be like the most High.
Code Breaker has made a lot of connections along these lines.

Richard

Richard Amiel McGough
09-03-2007, 11:06 AM
I was just reading a refutation (http://www.deceptioninthechurch.com/secondrebuttal.html)of John Piper's use of the phrase "Christian Hedonism" and was reminded of this cognate I noticed many years ago:


עדן `Eden {ay'-den} the same as 05730; TWOT - 1568; AV - Eden 17; 17
Eden= "pleasure" n pr m loc 1) the first habitat of man after the creation; site unknown n pr m 2) a Gershonite Levite, son of Joah in the days of king Hezekiah of Judah
The root is Stong's #5730:


עדן `eden {ay'-den} or (fem.) עדנה `ednah {ed-naw'} from 05727; TWOT - 1567a; n m/f AV - pleasure 2, delights 1, delicates 1; 4 1) luxury, dainty, delight, finery 2) delight
And this, of course, links directly to the English word hedonism:


Main Entry: he&#183;do&#183;nism
Pronunciation: 'hE-d&-"ni-z&m
Function: noun
Etymology: Greek hEdonE pleasure; akin to Greek hEdys sweet -- more at SWEET
1 : the doctrine that pleasure or happiness is the sole or chief good in life
2 : a way of life based on or suggesting the principles of hedonism
- he&#183;do&#183;nist /-nist/ noun
- he&#183;do&#183;nis&#183;tic /"hE-d&-'nis-tik/ adjective
- he&#183;do&#183;nis&#183;ti&#183;cal&#183;ly /-ti-k(&-)lE/ adverb
The Greek word mentioned in the etymology is the Greek hedone' = Strong's# 2237:


ηδονη hedone {hay-don-ay'} from handano (to please); TDNT - 2:909,303; n f AV - pleasure 3, lust 2; 5 1) pleasure 2) desires for pleasure


This word appears in five verses of the NT, such as:



Luke 8:14 And that which fell among thorns are they, which, when they have heard, go forth, and are choked with cares and riches and pleasures (hedone) of this life, and bring no fruit to perfection.

Richard

Richard Amiel McGough
09-18-2007, 04:44 PM
I was reading Zephaniah 1:7 and was reminded of this example of another near universal root:



הסה hasah {haw-saw'} a primitive root; TWOT - 511 AV - keep silence 3, hold your peace 2, hold your tongue 1 still 1, silence 1; 8 interj 1) (Piel) hush, keep silence, be silent, hold peace, hold tongue, still v 2) (CLBL) to hush 2a) (Hiphil) to command to be silent

Richard Amiel McGough
04-21-2008, 03:44 PM
I was just researching "global warming" and encountered a new term called the "cryosphere" which refers to the portion of the globe where water is frozen. I had not encountered this term before, and so clicked on the wikipedia article, and found this:

The cryosphere, derived from the Greek (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_language) word kryo for "cold (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold)" or "too cold", is the term which collectively describes the portions of the Earth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth)’s surface where water (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water) is in solid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solid) form, including sea ice (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_ice), lake ice, river ice (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice), snow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow) cover, glaciers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glaciers), ice caps (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_cap) and ice sheets (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_sheet), and frozen ground (which includes permafrost (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permafrost)). The cryosphere is an integral part of the global climate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_climate) system with important linkages and feedbacks (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feedback) generated through its influence on surface energy and moisture fluxes, clouds (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud), precipitation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precipitation_%28meteorology%29), hydrology (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrology), and atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Through these feedback (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feedback) processes, the cryosphere plays a significant role in global climate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_climate) and in climate model (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_model) response to global change.
Well that triggered my memory of the fundamental Hebrew root meaning "cold" ...

קר qar {kar} contracted from an unused root meaning to chill; TWOT - 2077a; adj AV - cold 2, variant 1; 3 1) cool 1a) cool, calm, self-possessed (of spirit)
So this looks like a good candidate for another Hebrew cognate.

Richard

Richard Amiel McGough
11-26-2008, 06:04 PM
I received a message from Isaac Mozeson, the author of the very useful and informative book called "The Word" in which he traced out many of the Hebrew roots of common English words. Here is the message:




Dear Bible Wheelers:

The thread is from June 07, but I'd like to congratulate all for so much good posting on Hebrew as Proto-Earth. My 1989 book, The Word is now twice as large -- but in CD form. I'd like to at least let you know about the website www.edenics.org (http://www.edenics.org)

Or, if this thread comes around agaion, wheel-like, I'd like to be able to participate.

We are moving from Genesis 11;1 to Tsephania 3:9.
Blessings, Isaac Mozeson


I too hope that Mr. Mozeson will come and participate in this thread.

We also could expand our conversation to include things we learn from his site www.edenics.org (http://www.edenics.org).

Richard

IsaacMozeson
12-17-2008, 09:04 PM
For years I have noticed many obvious Hebrew cognates on other languages. I am working to write an article on this topic, and thought it would be helpful to have input from others as I do the research.

The most amazing, profound, and revolutionary aspect of this study is that it offers the first true understanding of the phenomenon of near universal features found in the world's languages. For example, consider the near universal root ma as described in Appendix I (http://www.bartleby.com/61/roots/IE290.html) of the American Heritage Dictionary:

The near-universality of this root is discussed in this article (http://www.billcasselman.com/wording_room/mother.htm) from Bill Cassleman's website:

Cassleman asked "Why so widesread a word?" and then gave the standard academic answer which seems little more than an empty speculation. Try making the "smack-smack" sound of a nursing infant and see if you can hear the "ma-ma" sound. I tried it and found nothing. Of course, we can't blame the tradition-bound scholars for presenting such a lame explanation as if it were "obvious," since their assumptions have blinded them to the possibility that Hebrew could be something more than just another language that "evolved" along with the human apes. Isaac Mozeson (http://www.homestead.com/edenics/) responded to the traditional academic explanation in his entry under "mama" on page 104 of his very helpful book called "The Word: The Dictionary that Reveals the Hebrew Sources of English":




Mozeson went on to note that the ultimate root of these mamma words is the Hebrew Em, "which signifies the 'womb' or 'origin.'" This is exactly what I published in the review of Spoke 13 (Mem) of the Bible Wheel book, reproduced online in the article called From the Waters of Judah (http://www.biblewheel.com/Wheel/Spokes/Mem_1Chronicles.asp):


This is what I mean when I say that Hebrew offers a revolutionary understanding of the near-universals found in the language. We do not have to speculate about some hypothetical physical mechanism that "causes" nearly all babies everywhere to say "mama" - we can see that the word mama has intrinsic meaning that is derived from the Divine Language designed by God as the foundation of His Word by which He created all that is.

I am opening this thread so folks have a place to present any Hebrew cognates they find. I also want to discuss what this all means, and how it relates to the story of Babel, and how the languages could have originally been divided there, and then were transformed further under ordinary "evolution" that so enamors the modern mind.

I will begin with a few of the more obvious examples. Hebrew consonants will be written as bold capitals. I list with Strongs numbers for convenience:

==============================
Hebrew: 0817 AShaM {aw-shawm'}
Meaning: 1) guilt, offense, guiltiness

English: AShaMed: Feeling shame or guilt

==============================
Hebrew 5307 NaPhaL {naw-fal'}
Meaning: 1) to fall

English: FaLL

==============================
Hebrew 7919 SaKaL {saw-kal'}
Meaning: 1) to be prudent, be circumspect, wisely understand, prosper ...
Usage: AV - understand 12, wise 12, prosper 8, wisely 6, understanding 5, consider 4, instruct 3, prudent 2, skill 2, teach 2, misc 7; 63

English: SKiLL

It is interesting that sakal comes through almost as if it were transliterated from the Hebrew, rather than translated, in Daniel 9:22: And he informed me, and talked with me, and said, O Daniel, I am now come forth to give thee skill (sakal) and understanding.

======================================
Here is an example that Mozeson uses on the homepage of his website (http://www.homestead.com/edenics/):

4376 MaKaR {maw-kar'}
Meaning: 1) to sell

English MaRKet (verb, to sell)

Try pronouncing "mawkar market" a few times and you will hear how similar they are. This example shows how the consonants get scrambled between languages.

Well, that's sufficient for an introduction to the topic. I look forward to your contributions.

Richard

Dear Richard and Forum Wheelies:

I'm not sure if I'm writing in the right place. This format is new to me, sorry.
The title above is in appreciation of Richard's great riff on Aleph-Mem, אם ,
mother, and the Mem-vowel word for water -- like MaYAh (water in Aramaic).
In Hebrew water is מים
MaYiM, always plural, like "waters." Because water pools together.

Mom n' Pop words are the least impressive, when it comes to being near universal. Family names are supposed to be the least likely to change. (Of course, Richard pointed out how only Hebrew e x p l a i n e d w h y an M-vowel/vowel-M word MEANT mama.

Actually, the word "Hebrew" can be a problem. The Hebrews are a historical people, and even their language has been a bit sullied by foreign borrowings. Even Biblical Hebrew is too historic. The pristine PRE-Hebrew, before the neurolinguistic Big Bang of language diversity is what I want to uncover and discuss. History was kickstarted at the tower incident in Shinar (or Sumer, referenced as the much later Babel). So, we want a PREhistoric Hebrew, as spoken by angels and humans at the Garden of Eden. Thus I call this Pre-Hebrew EDENIC. Edenic joins all children of Adam, all humanity. For some, the term "Hebrew" can be divisive.

Back to near-universal words, my favorite is SACK. It is not a word as common as mama and papa. But 1000s of languages have an S-K (fricative-guttural) work for a baglike container. Only in Hebrew, I mean Edenic, does the reverse, K-S, have a relevant meaning. SahQ שק is a sack, while KeeY$
כיס is a pocket or slip CASE. Yes, now you know where CASE is from, or to ENCASE. There is a whole family of throat-made + whistling, guttural-fricative words for various coverings. Reading an entry like "ENCASE" or "SACK" in my dictionary will demonstrate how a SHACK is a larger but like-sounding SACK (covering, that is).

If you check out my introductory documents, you'll see that SOUND is SENSE.
Sound is energy. Our Creator used hard science. Academics think that language is a chaotic jumble that evolved from gabby gibbons. But at its CORE
(מקור MaQOAR means source) , from the natural majesty of Edenic, we can find divine design even in English.

I look forward to learning much from your comments and questions, Isaac

Richard Amiel McGough
12-17-2008, 09:56 PM
Hello Isaac,

Welcome to our forum!

:welcome:

I can't tell you how thrilled I am to have a man with your knowledge and expertise here in our forum to discuss your excellent work.


Dear Richard and Forum Wheelies:

I'm not sure if I'm writing in the right place. This format is new to me, sorry.

This thread is a fine place to start the conversation. But note also that I started this thread devoted specifically to your work.



The title above is in appreciation of Richard's great riff on Aleph-Mem, אם ,
mother, and the Mem-vowel word for water -- like MaYAh (water in Aramaic).
In Hebrew water is מים
MaYiM, always plural, like "waters." Because water pools together.

Mom n' Pop words are the least impressive, when it comes to being near universal. Family names are supposed to be the least likely to change. (Of course, Richard pointed out how only Hebrew e x p l a i n e d w h y an M-vowel/vowel-M word MEANT mama.

Yes, the fact that there is MEANING built into the mama-word that also coherently integrates with the general semantic patterns of the Divine Language elevates the conclusions far above any competing explanation, such as blind evolution or onomatopoetics.

The "birth of the nation" by the "breaking of waters" is extremely profound. The same idea is repeated in the Christian tradition and explicilty based on the older Jewish tradition. Paul likened the passing through the Red Sea as a "baptism" (= Miqvah) and this, in turn, is likened to a new "birth in the Spirit."



Actually, the word "Hebrew" can be a problem. The Hebrews are a historical people, and even their language has been a bit sullied by foreign borrowings. Even Biblical Hebrew is too historic. The pristine PRE-Hebrew, before the neurolinguistic Big Bang of language diversity is what I want to uncover and discuss. History was kickstarted at the tower incident in Shinar (or Sumer, referenced as the much later Babel). So, we want a PREhistoric Hebrew, as spoken by angels and humans at the Garden of Eden. Thus I call this Pre-Hebrew EDENIC. Edenic joins all children of Adam, all humanity. For some, the term "Hebrew" can be divisive.

I agree with your goal to find the "PREhistoric Hebrew." I myself have been comfortable with the term "Hebrew" and have not encountered any "divisiveness" as yet. I like the term because it is broadly understood. But it has the shortcoming of seeming to imply that Biblical Hebrew is the exact form of the original tongue, and that probably is incorrect. My only hesitation with using "Edenics" is that it is unfamiliar to most, and so might not be understood. But I have no problem using it for the sake of our conversations here.



Back to near-universal words, my favorite is SACK. It is not a word as common as mama and papa. But 1000s of languages have an S-K (fricative-guttural) work for a baglike container. Only in Hebrew, I mean Edenic, does the reverse, K-S, have a relevant meaning. SahQ שק is a sack, while KeeY$
כיס is a pocket or slip CASE. Yes, now you know where CASE is from, or to ENCASE. There is a whole family of throat-made + whistling, guttural-fricative words for various coverings. Reading an entry like "ENCASE" or "SACK" in my dictionary will demonstrate how a SHACK is a larger but like-sounding SACK (covering, that is).

If you check out my introductory documents, you'll see that SOUND is SENSE.
Sound is energy. Our Creator used hard science. Academics think that language is a chaotic jumble that evolved from gabby gibbons. But at its CORE
(מקור MaQOAR means source) , from the natural majesty of Edenic, we can find divine design even in English.

I look forward to learning much from your comments and questions, Isaac
I have long been aware of the S-K root, but I had not noticed the relation to "CASE." I will have to give that a little thought. Klein's Etymological Dictionary links it to the Latin capsa < capere = to catch, sieze, hold. But then he links "chest" to cista (L) and an few similar IE words that ultimate originated from the Greek XISTH (chistey, basket). He sites the OIr cess and ciss which mean "basket." It seems like "case" is much more closely related to this nexus which coheres well with your observation.

Do you have other examples of reversal being significant? Anagrams are very significant in my estimation. For example, the first born BKR received the birthright BRKH.

Well, I got to go. Again, welcome to our forum!

Richard

PS: Klein really astounds me with his blindness. I own both his "Etymological Dictionary of the Hebrew Language" and his "Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the English Language" and the only links that he admits between them are the obvious imports such as "Amen" or "Jubilee."

IsaacMozeson
12-25-2008, 07:36 PM
As I was reading a post by Stephen on another thread I noticed this....



Rose

OPHaN אופן should be a big word for the Bible WHEEL folks. I see it as unrelaten to OPEN.
The Pey/Phey-Noon family of PoiNters is well documenteed in dict. entries like "POINT" and in "The Origin of Speeches" where there is a chapter on word families. In short, take every lip-formed bilabial (B,F,P,V, W) and put on before N, and you with get a member of this family. Use every vowel, and look for English or non-English words. In English, a BIN, FAN. PIN, PEN, VANE and WINd is about pointing, about an inner or outer surface.

OPHaN also means a facet, PaNiM is a face or facet. An OPHaN wheel has revolving surfaces or PANES (like a PANE, surface, of glass).

OPEN is traced to an Indo-Europen (IE) root called upo. There are no IE roots, but the research behind them is often valuable. The N in OPEN is not historic. Any OPEN-OPHaN link is bogus. As is often the case, reversing the IE "root" gets to the heart of the true Edenic (Biblical Hebrew, pre Tower of Babel) root and meaning. פה PeH is a mouth. It gave languages the vowel-bilabial or bilabial-vowel root meaning OPEN.

If requested, I'd paste from dict. entries at greater length. I don't know how much room I have. I'll paste short excerpts below.
Blessings, Isaac

OP(EN) PeH Pey-Hey
PEH פה [PHOP]
ROOTS: The confused IE 'root' for OPEN is upo (under, up, over). The lexigocraphers were not open to having a source older than Old English, so they opted for an implausible, overused fiction – see 'AVIATE.' The Edenic mouth, פה PeH (Genesis 11:8), also can mean any OPENING or orifice in Akkadian, Aramaic. Figurative uses of this mouth-opening word include the mouth of a river to a person’s utterances. To add a Sin to Pey-Hey, see שפהSaPHaH (lip) at 'BUSS.' The other facial OPENING is, similarly, פPey and a vowel. A near-reversal to א-פ Aleph-Phey brings us to that other facial OPENING: אף AhPH, nose (Genesis 2:7).


PANE PaNeeYM Pey-Noon-Yod-Mem
PUN-(EEM)_________פנים_________[PN]
ROOTS: A PANE is a flat piece of material, the flat side of something that has many sides. Similarly, a PANEL is a flat piece of wood, etc. that forms a surface.
The second verse in the Bible has the Creator hovering over the "face" or the "surface of" the waters. Edenic PiNaH and פנים PaNeeYM means face, countenance, front and surface (Genesis 43:31). As a verb, PaNaH is to face (Genesis 18:22). Our reference books can only offer Latin pannus (piece of cloth, rag) and the IE 'root' pan (fabric) as the source of PANE, PANEL, VANE (which points out or faces wind direction) and PANICLE (see "PANIC").
While the direction here is merely the surface, it is still a member
Of the large פ-נ Pey-Noon family seen at 'POINT' and in the word family chapter of The Origin of Speeches. Why is פנים PaNeeYM plural? Because we have many faces: a ''game face' and one for children., etc. The same פנים Pey-Noon-Yod-Mem in פנים PiNeeYM (inside – ee 'BIN') is the built-in opposite of פנים PaNeeYM (face, facet… the exterior front).

BRANCHES: אופן OWPHeN means 1) wheel (Ezekiel 3:12), and 2) a manner or facet. It belongs in our פ-נ Pey-Noon family. A פ-נ Pey-Noon facet is the same as a face, so אופן OWPHeN is much the same as פנים PaNeeYM (face, source of PANE). A wheel changes its surface or PANE as it spins. When in motion, a wheel can have 'no surface,' thus the א Alef as negative prefix before our פ-נ Pey-Noon subroot.

Richard Amiel McGough
12-25-2008, 10:20 PM
OPHaN אופן should be a big word for the Bible WHEEL folks. I see it as unrelaten to OPEN.
The Pey/Phey-Noon family of PoiNters is well documenteed in dict. entries like "POINT" and in "The Origin of Speeches" where there is a chapter on word families. In short, take every lip-formed bilabial (B,F,P,V, W) and put on before N, and you with get a member of this family. Use every vowel, and look for English or non-English words. In English, a BIN, FAN. PIN, PEN, VANE and WINd is about pointing, about an inner or outer surface.

OPHaN also means a facet, PaNiM is a face or facet. An OPHaN wheel has revolving surfaces or PANES (like a PANE, surface, of glass).

Hi Isaac,


You are certainly correct - I have been quite interested in the meaning of "ophan" used in the vision of Ezekiel's Wheels, and I came to similar conclusions as you. Here is what I said about it in this article (http://www.biblewheel.com/Wheel/Ezekiel_Wheels.asp) after discussing the meaning of "galgal" and its relation to galah (to reveal):
Throughout most of Ezekiel's vision, the word translated as "wheel" is not galgal, but ophan. It is not until a later vision in Ezekiel 10:13 that the vision as a whole is declared to be the Galgal. The word ophan is from the root panah meaning "to turn" or "to look" which also is the root of the Pey KeyWord panim (face) as discussed at length on Spoke 17 (BW book pg 306 (http://www.biblewheel.com/Wheel/Spokes/Peh_Mouth.asp#Esther)). Its plural form ophanim differs from panim only by the initial Aleph (and the Vav which functions as a vowel). These words are closely related and they both play central roles in Ezekiel's vision. It is in the wheels (ophanim) and the Four Faces (Panim) of the Cherubim that God displays His character and glory. This is amplified by looking at ophan as a Hebrew Word Picture (http://www.biblewheel.com/RR/FTS_WordPictures.asp) (BW book pg 115). Applying what we learned in the Synopsis of the Twenty-Two Spokes, we see Aleph as a symbol of God the Creator (Spoke 1, BW book pg 121 (http://www.biblewheel.com/Wheel/Spokes/Aleph_Origins.asp)), Pey as a symbol of the Face of God (Spoke 17, pg 307 (http://www.biblewheel.com/Wheel/Spokes/Peh_Mouth.asp#Esther)), and Nun as a symbol of Eternality (Spoke 14, BW book pg 271 (http://www.biblewheel.com/Wheel/Spokes/Nun_Melchizedek.asp#Eternal)). Putting these ideas together into an English phrase, we see the vision of the ophanim as representing Divine Phenomena that reveal the Eternal Face of God, exactly as the text has been interpreted for millennia. The power of this root is such that cognates appear in many languages, most notably in Latin, Greek, and English words with similar meanings. Our word phenomenon is from the Latin phaenomenon http://www.biblewheel.com/images/globe_tiny.gif (http://www2.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/mwdictsn?va=phenomenon), which in turn is based on the Greek fainomenon (phainomenon), the root being phaino which means to shine, to appear, or to show forth. God used this word in His explanation of faith as a mode of cognition (knowing, understanding):
Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen. For by it the elders obtained a good report. Through faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that things which are seen were not made of things which do appear (phaino). Hebrews 11:1ff (Spoke 14, Cycle 3, BW book pg 284)

God also used this word to describe the light of His Creative Word, saying "The light shineth (phaino) in the darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not" (John 1:5), and again to describe the face of His Son, the Living Word, which blazes as "the sun shineth (phaino) in his strength" (Rev 1:16).

What do you think about the connection between Pey-Nun and "phaino" and "phenomenon"?



OPEN is traced to an Indo-Europen (IE) root called upo. There are no IE roots, but the research behind them is often valuable. The N in OPEN is not historic. Any OPEN-OPHaN link is bogus. As is often the case, reversing the IE "root" gets to the heart of the true Edenic (Biblical Hebrew, pre Tower of Babel) root and meaning. פה PeH is a mouth. It gave languages the vowel-bilabial or bilabial-vowel root meaning OPEN.

I agree that the "active consonant" in OPEN is Pey = Mouth. But I don't understand why you say that the N in OPEN is not historic. Klein lists many cognates such as OHG offen, Swe opan, and many others that mimic the P-N pattern.



If requested, I'd paste from dict. entries at greater length. I don't know how much room I have. I'll paste short excerpts below.
Blessings, Isaac

You have all the room you need. Please feel free to post whatever you like. The only challenge is that long posts are often difficult to answer, and might interupt the flow of conversation.

Many blessings,

Richard

IsaacMozeson
01-05-2009, 04:16 PM
PANE PaNeeYM Pey-Noon-Yod-Mem
PUN-(EEM)_________פנים_________[PN]
ROOTS: A PANE is a flat piece of material, the flat side of something that has many sides. Similarly, a PANEL is a flat piece of wood, etc. that forms a surface.
The second verse in the Bible has the Creator hovering over the "face" or the "surface of" the waters. Edenic PiNaH and פנים PaNeeYM means face, countenance, front and surface (Genesis 43:31). As a verb, PaNaH is to face (Genesis 18:22). Our reference books can only offer Latin pannus (piece of cloth, rag) and the IE 'root' pan (fabric) as the source of PANE, PANEL, VANE (which points out or faces wind direction) and PANICLE (see "PANIC").
While the direction here is merely the surface, it is still a member
Of the large פ-נ Pey-Noon family seen at 'POINT' and in the word family chapter of The Origin of Speeches. Why is פנים PaNeeYM plural? Because we have many faces: a ''game face' and one for children., etc. The same פנים Pey-Noon-Yod-Mem in פנים PiNeeYM (inside – ee 'BIN') is the built-in opposite of פנים PaNeeYM (face, facet… the exterior front).

BRANCHES: אופן OWPHeN means 1) wheel (Ezekiel 3:12), and 2) a manner or facet. It belongs in our פ-נ Pey-Noon family. A פ-נ Pey-Noon facet is the same as a face, so אופן OWPHeN is much the same as פנים PaNeeYM (face, source of PANE). A wheel changes its surface or PANE as it spins. When in motion, a wheel can have 'no surface,' thus the א Alef as negative prefix before our פ-נ Pey-Noon subroot.
דפן DoPHeN is a board or partition, another PANEL. A VN surface word like VENEER is currently attributed to Old French fournir (to furnish). PAINT (allegedly from Latin pingere) is another PN term of surfacing. PiNaY is the 'surface' of the waters in the second verse of Genesis. Chinese ping X508 means 'even, smooth… as water surface.'
Showing the face or appearance is the sense of Greek phainesthai (to appear) and therefore of DIAPHONOUS, EMPHASIS, EPIPHANY, FANTASY, HIEROPHANT, PANT, PHANEROGAM, PHANTASM, PHANTASMAGORIA, PHANTOM, PHASE (see 'PHASE OUT'), PHENO-, PHENOMENON, PHOSPHENE, SYCOPHANT, THEOPHANY and TIFFANY.
All these P-N words of appearance are listed under the IE 'root' bha-! (to shine). PaNa$ is as lantern. But a PHANTOM suddendly makes an appearance visible on the Pey-Noon pane (face, facet) or plane of our reality. It does not 'shine' forth.
To VANISH (see 'VANISH') is to never show one's face. As our face precedes us, so (Lee)PH’NaY (before, in the face of, in front of) was before Old French avant (before) in allowing the development of words like VANGUARD, VAM(P), ADVANCE and (AD)VANTAGE. Learning Hebrew is AVANT-GARDE. (AVAUNT, meaning 'hence' is now archaic.)
Other entries will PAN out over the wide PAMORAMA of BN, FN, VN or WN words of direction that are WINDING to all four WINDS. See PiINeeYM (interior) and the POINTING inward at "PENETRATION."
The Pey-Noon, PANE or surface of something is best in describing an object’s appearance (as in PHENO- words above) and it’s manner, shape or style. OWPHahN is defined as manner or style in the Ben-Yehudah dictionary. The way it is translated by the KJV in Proverbs 25:11 one would not know it, but אופן OWFahN may be behind the backward synonym pair: MORPH and FORM. Both mean 'shape;' one is M(R)F, the other F(R)M. This phenomenon, proving that words were designed and scrambled, and not evolved, appears in other word pairs like: ALTO/TALL, CAVity/VACuum, FOLIO/LEAF, and ROTARY/TIRE.
The middle R is deemphasized in considering these two as Pey-Noon surface or appearance words that belong here at 'PANE.' The PH and F are easily from פPhey. The נNoon has morphed into an M. The OR comes from the א-ו Aleph-Vav of אופן OWPHahN. This PHENOMENON is best seen at the 'OR' entry.
Chinese ping X508 means flat and even, and later refers to level ground, a flat fish, and a flat plant on the 'surface of water' (recalling Genesis 1:2). Ping X509 is a screen or protective facing.
Lest you thought the FORM-MORPH connection was fanciful, the two are cognates at the IE 'root' merph (form – 'root of unknown origin').
The AHD also links the derivatives of Greek morphe, form, outward appearance,
[-MORPHE, MORPHEME, MORPHO- and MORPHOSIS] with those of Latin forma, form, shape, appearance [ CONFORM, DEFORM, FORMAL and FORMULA].
The French bilabial-nasal 'front' is the VN in devant.


[see how the Divine architectonics of Pey-Hey does not allow Peh to be intimatey related to Pey-Noon or PaNiM (face, facet). Nonetheless, Pey is an importany first element within PaNiM, just as no face is complete with the mouth or nose (OPenings).]

OP(EN) PeH Pey-Hey
PEH פה [PHOP]
ROOTS: The confused IE 'root' for OPEN is upo (under, up, over). The lexigocraphers were not open to having a source older than Old English, so they opted for an implausible, overused fiction – see 'AVIATE.' The Edenic mouth, פה PeH (Genesis 11:8), also can mean any OPENING or orifice in Akkadian, Aramaic. Figurative uses of this mouth-opening word include the mouth of a river to a person’s utterances. To add a Sin to Pey-Hey, see שפהSaPHaH (lip) at 'BUSS.' The other facial OPENING is, similarly, פPey and a vowel. A near-reversal to א-פ Aleph-Phey brings us to that other facial OPENING: אף AhPH, nose (Genesis 2:7).

BRANCHES: One extension, פיפיה PeeYPHiYaH means mouth or opening as the sharp edge (biting edge) of a sword (Isaiah 41:15). Harden פPeH toפ-ח Pey-Het, and פך PaK[H] is to breathe or blow.
The mouth of a Chinese river is pu X513. The Paa is an Eskimo: Inupiak doorway. Ip (reverse P-vowel as we do in English) is a Korean (mouth). While the Hey of PeH softens in OPEN, or the Korean, it hardens as one goes from the French mouth (bouche) to the Spanish boca. Harder still is the pecking BEAK of the bird. BEAK, Latin beccus, has no alleged IE 'root'. Elsewhere, the Babel-babble concentrated on the bilabial. In Proto-Eastern-Polynesian, an opening is fafa. A Hawaiaan mouth is a waha. In Malay (dialect 59) it’s boah. In Mandarin Chinese we reverse AhPH (nose, flaring nosrils and thus anger – Exodus 34:6) to get fu X181 (looking angry, glowering).
In Cantonese a chin is hah pah. Hah means 'below,' but the pah element is unknown. If pah is from Edenic PeH, then hah pah (chin) would mean 'under the mouth.' (George Shen)

Victor
04-11-2009, 02:31 PM
I find interesting the little similarity between the Hebrew word token (Strong's # 8506; measure, quantity, quota) and the English word token.

Victor
11-26-2009, 04:11 PM
The Hebrew word Mistar (Strong's #4565) means Secret, Mystery. There is a very interesting similarity between the Hebrew Mistar, the Greek Musterion and the English Mystery. The English word comes from the Greek, but that doesn't explain the mysterious resemblance to the Hebrew Mistar.

Victor
11-26-2009, 04:46 PM
Right after I wrote the post above, I sat down to read some Scripture. I opened my Bible on a random page. My mind was not even concentrated on what I was doing as I opened Scripture. The very first word that my eyes just happened to fall upon was the word "mystery"!! It was the NIV version, in Daniel 2:18.

It was completely unintentional. As I read "mystery" printed on the page, I was not even thinking about the word that I was reading - it was only a second or two later that I felt the impact. :brick:

Now, there are over 444,000 words in the Bible. The word mystery (together with mysteries) appears about 30 times in the NIV. I don't understand how can that be. What are the chances?

What just happened is what I can call a real MYSTERY!

Rose
11-26-2009, 05:56 PM
Right after I wrote the post above, I sat down to read some Scripture. I opened my Bible on a random page. My mind was not even concentrated on what I was doing as I opened Scripture. The very first word that my eyes just happened to fall upon was the word "mystery"!! It was the NIV version, in Daniel 2:18.

It was completely unintentional. As I read "mystery" printed on the page, I was not even thinking about the word that I was reading - it was only a second or two later that I felt the impact. :brick:

Now, there are over 444,000 words in the Bible. The word mystery (together with mysteries) appears about 30 times in the NIV. I don't understand how can that be. What are the chances?

What just happened is what I can call a real MYSTERY!

Don't you just love it when that happens (not getting hit in the head with a brick :lol:). I think it's one of Gods ways of telling us that He's communing with us all the time, even for the smallest things....:winking0071:


Rose

Divine Wind
10-07-2012, 09:47 AM
The understanding of the true meaning of the Hebrew word sepher is the key to understanding the mysteries of the Bible.

Also, regarding cognates, you should definitely look at the work of Jeff Benner: :prophet:
http://www.ancient-hebrew.org/

Richard Amiel McGough
10-07-2012, 10:17 AM
The understanding of the true meaning of the Hebrew word sepher is the key to understanding the mysteries of the Bible.

Also, regarding cognates, you should definitely look at the work of Jeff Benner: :prophet:
http://www.ancient-hebrew.org/

Hey there Divine Wind,

Welcome to our forum!

:welcome:

I'm familiar with that site. He has lots of good insights if I recall correctly.

Care to elaborate about how sepher is the key?

All the best,

Richard

gilgal
10-27-2012, 08:52 PM
Mother in Armenian is mayr

David M
10-28-2012, 01:36 AM
Hello Richard
I see this thread was started in 2007. This thread does not reflect the transition you have made in your faith over the last six years as do some of your other threads that span the same period.

Whilst I cannot contribute any knowledge of the Hebrew language, do you see this as supporting the fact that the Hebrew language might have been one of the oldest languages going back to the origin of man?

Whilst reading your opening post; the expression came to me; "out of the mouth of babes..". This should please women, the fact that the first words a baby utters is taken as referring to its mother. The dad (the male) does not figure until later when the child begins to form more sounds. It is one up for the ladies.

All the best

David

Ali Cestar
05-02-2014, 11:51 PM
Hi Richard, few years ago I did my personal research on cognates of Minangkabau - Hebrew and Minangkabau - English and published them in a webisite I persnonally managed. There I published hundreds of cognates that relate Hebrew and English to Minangkabau, a language originally spoken by people from West Sumatra, Indonesia. I see you are talented in this field and hope you can be my partner to write a serious book upon this matter. I found this website from Google and may not come back here again and forgotten about this communication, if that case occures, please contact me using email to ali_cestar@yahoo.com if you are interested in this kind of partnership.