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CWH
06-12-2011, 01:16 AM
You think English is easy???

Read to the end . . .*tell me your comment*


The bandage was wound around the wound.


The farm was used to produce produce .


Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time to present the present

When shot at, the dove dove into the bushes.

The insurance was invalid for the invalid.

There was a row among the oarsmen about how to row

13) They were too close to the door to close it.

14) The buck does funny things when the does are present.

A seamstress and a sewer fell down into a sewer line.

17) The wind was too strong to wind the sail.

18) Upon seeing the tear in the painting I shed a tear.

I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.

How can I intimate this to my most intimate friend?


Let's face it - English is a crazy language. There is no egg in eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple. English muffins weren't invented in England or French fries in France . Sweetmeats are candies while sweetbreads, which aren't sweet, are meat. We take English for granted. But if we explore its paradox e s, we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.

And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing, grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham? If the plural of tooth is teeth, why isn't the plural of booth, beeth? One goose, 2 geese. So one moose, 2 meese? One index, 2 indices? Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend? If you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?

If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught? If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat? Sometimes I think all the English speakers should be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane. In what language do people recite at a play and play at a recital? Ship by truck and send cargo by ship? Have noses that run and feet that smell?

How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same, while a wise man and a wise guy a r e opposites? You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language in which your house can burn up as it burns down, in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which, an alarm goes off by going on.

English was invented by people, not computers, and it reflects the creativity of the human race, which, of course, is not a race at all That is why, when the stars are out, they are visible, but when the lights are out, they are invisible.

PS. - Why doesn't 'Buick' rhyme with 'quick'


You lovers of the English language might enjoy this .

There is a two-letter word that perhaps has more meanings than any other two-letter word, and that is 'UP.'

It's easy to understandUP, meaning t oward the sky or at the top of the list, but when we awaken in the morning, why do we wake UP? *At a meeting, why does a topic comeUP? *Why do we speak UPand why are the officersUPfor election and why is it UPto the secretary to writeUPa report ?

We callUPour friends. *And we use it to brightenUPa room, polishUPthe silver, we warm UPthe leftovers and clean UPthe kitchen. *We lockUPthe house and some guys fixUPthe old car .* At other times the little word has real special meaning. *Peop le stirUPtrouble, lineUPfor tickets, workUPan appetite, and think UPexcuses. To be dressed is one thing, but to be dressed UPis special.

And thisUPis confusing: *A drain must be openedUPbecause it is stopped UP.We openUPa store in the morning but we close it UPat night.

We seem to be pretty mixedUPabout UP !To be knowledgeable about the proper uses ofUP,look the wordUPin the dictionary. *In a desk-sized dictionary, it takesUPalmost 1/4th of the page and can addUPto about thirty definitions. I f you are UPto it, you might try buildingUPa list of the many ways UPis used. *It wil l takeUPa lot of your time, but if you don't give UP,you may windUPwith a hundred or more. When it threatens to rain, we say it is clouding UP* When the sun comes out we say it is clearingUP..

When it rains, it wets the earth and often messes things UP.

When it doesn't rain for awhile, things dryUP

One could go on and on, but I'll wrap itUP, for now my time is *UP, so............ it is time to shut UP...!

Many Blessings.

Rose
06-12-2011, 08:20 AM
You think English is easy???

Read to the end . . .*tell me your comment*


The bandage was wound around the wound.


The farm was used to produce produce .


Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time to present the present

When shot at, the dove dove into the bushes.

The insurance was invalid for the invalid.

There was a row among the oarsmen about how to row

13) They were too close to the door to close it.

14) The buck does funny things when the does are present.

A seamstress and a sewer fell down into a sewer line.

17) The wind was too strong to wind the sail.

18) Upon seeing the tear in the painting I shed a tear.

I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.

How can I intimate this to my most intimate friend?


Let's face it - English is a crazy language. There is no egg in eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple. English muffins weren't invented in England or French fries in France . Sweetmeats are candies while sweetbreads, which aren't sweet, are meat. We take English for granted. But if we explore its paradox e s, we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.

And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing, grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham? If the plural of tooth is teeth, why isn't the plural of booth, beeth? One goose, 2 geese. So one moose, 2 meese? One index, 2 indices? Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend? If you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?

If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught? If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat? Sometimes I think all the English speakers should be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane. In what language do people recite at a play and play at a recital? Ship by truck and send cargo by ship? Have noses that run and feet that smell?

How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same, while a wise man and a wise guy a r e opposites? You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language in which your house can burn up as it burns down, in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which, an alarm goes off by going on.

English was invented by people, not computers, and it reflects the creativity of the human race, which, of course, is not a race at all That is why, when the stars are out, they are visible, but when the lights are out, they are invisible.

PS. - Why doesn't 'Buick' rhyme with 'quick'


You lovers of the English language might enjoy this .

There is a two-letter word that perhaps has more meanings than any other two-letter word, and that is 'UP.'

It's easy to understandUP, meaning t oward the sky or at the top of the list, but when we awaken in the morning, why do we wake UP? *At a meeting, why does a topic comeUP? *Why do we speak UPand why are the officersUPfor election and why is it UPto the secretary to writeUPa report ?

We callUPour friends. *And we use it to brightenUPa room, polishUPthe silver, we warm UPthe leftovers and clean UPthe kitchen. *We lockUPthe house and some guys fixUPthe old car .* At other times the little word has real special meaning. *Peop le stirUPtrouble, lineUPfor tickets, workUPan appetite, and think UPexcuses. To be dressed is one thing, but to be dressed UPis special.

And thisUPis confusing: *A drain must be openedUPbecause it is stopped UP.We openUPa store in the morning but we close it UPat night.

We seem to be pretty mixedUPabout UP !To be knowledgeable about the proper uses ofUP,look the wordUPin the dictionary. *In a desk-sized dictionary, it takesUPalmost 1/4th of the page and can addUPto about thirty definitions. I f you are UPto it, you might try buildingUPa list of the many ways UPis used. *It wil l takeUPa lot of your time, but if you don't give UP,you may windUPwith a hundred or more. When it threatens to rain, we say it is clouding UP* When the sun comes out we say it is clearingUP..

When it rains, it wets the earth and often messes things UP.

When it doesn't rain for awhile, things dryUP

One could go on and on, but I'll wrap itUP, for now my time is *UP, so............ it is time to shut UP...!

Many Blessings.

Thanks for the UPbeat post, without beatingUP on anyone...maybe you could even digUP some beets to eat...:lol:

Rose

Richard Amiel McGough
06-12-2011, 09:43 PM
Thanks for the UPbeat post, without beatingUP on anyone...maybe you could even digUP some beets to eat...:lol:

Rose
Yes, CWH honored us with a wonderful post. It was so UPlifting I knew it would be a long time before I got fed UP with it.

I've given UP on a lot of things, but never given down. What's UP with that?

I've seen plenty of things OUT of whack, but never something in whack.

I've seen many folks lacking ruth, but never one possessing it!

English is tough language to work through. I've had enough.

CWH
07-02-2011, 08:51 AM
You think English is easy?.....wait till you see the video on the conversation between Condoleezza Rice and George Bush:
:lmbo:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frMz9s3OLwY


May God Mercy be with all of us.

duxrow
07-02-2011, 10:18 AM
You think English is easy?.....wait till you see the video on the conversation between Condoleezza Rice and George Bush:
:lmbo:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frMz9s3OLwY


:lol: Great--everyone should see this! and loved the post, too -- reminded me of "Our Confounded Language", Gen 11:7, and of how THEY came down in sequence.. God on the Mountain, Jesus as a babe, and the HG as a mighty rushing wind. amen? :thumb:

CWH
07-04-2011, 09:00 AM
No wonder we used to misinterpret thew Bible!....because it is translated to English from a foreign language.

Genesis 11:6 The LORD said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. 7 Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.”
Genesis 11:8 So the LORD scattered them from there over all the earth, and they stopped building the city. 9 That is why it was called Babel[c]—because there the LORD confused the language of the whole world. From there the LORD scattered them over the face of the whole earth.

There are dozens of other examples of words such as these that look the same, are spelled the same, but are pronounced differently and have different meanings, making English such a challenge to learn.

The following examples show what can happen when a translation is made from a dictionary without taking into account the cultural elements of the other language.

1. When American Airlines wanted to advertise its new leather first-class seats in the Mexican market, it translated its "Fly in Leather" campaign literally, which meant "Fly Naked" (vuela en cuero) in Spanish.

2. When Parker Pen marketed a ball-point pen in Mexico, its ads were supposed to have read, "It won't leak in your pocket and embarrass you." The company thought that the word "embarazar" (to impregnate) meant to embarrass, so the ad read, "It won't leak in your pocket and make you pregnant."

3. Frank Perdue's chicken slogan, "It takes a strong man to make a tender chicken." was translated into Spanish as "It takes an aroused man to make a chicken affectionate."

4. The Coca-Cola name in China was first read as "Kekoukela", meaning "Bite the wax tadpole or "female horse stuffed with wax", depending on the dialect. Coke then researched 40,000 characters to find a phonetic equivalent, "kokou kole", translating into "happiness in the mouth."

5. Pepsi's "Come alive with the Pepsi Generation" translated into "Pepsi brings your ancestors back from the grave" in Chinese.

6. An American T-shirt maker in Miami printed shirts for the Spanish market which promoted the Pope's visit. Instead of "I Saw the Pope" (el Papa), the shirts read "I Saw the Potato" (la papa).

7. Colgate introduced a toothpaste in France called Cue, which was also the name of a notorious pornographic magazine.

8. When Gerber started selling baby food in Africa, they used the same packaging as in the U.S., with the smiling baby on the label. Later they learned that in Africa, companies routinely put pictures on the label of what was inside, since many people could not read.

9. Clairol introduced the "Mist Stick," a curling iron, into Germany only to find out that "mist" is slang for manure. Not many people had use for the "Manure Stick".

10. Scandinavian vacuum manufacturer Electrolux used the following in an American campaign: "Nothing sucks like an Electrolux."

11. Coors put its slogan, "Turn it Loose!", into Spanish, where it was read as "Suffer from diarrhea."

12. The Dairy Association's huge success with the campaign "Got Milk?" prompted them to expand advertising into Mexico. It was soon brought to their attention that the Spanish translation read: "Are you lactating?".


May many God Blessings comes your way.:pray:

CWH
07-05-2011, 01:24 PM
More crazy English phrases.....

If unbutton and button, tie and untie are opposite; then how come loosen and unloosen mean the same? A harmful action is the opposite of harmless action, but shameful and shameless actions are the same. Appropriate and inappropriate mean opposite, but flammable and inflammable mean the same. uplift means to lift up but upset does not mean to set up!!!

A waiter is a person who serves the food but it is the customer who is actually waiting!!!
A non stop flight or bus – I could never understand what this means; perhaps it means that it doesn’t have a particular stop so it will stop everywhere.
A hot cup of coffee - After all who cares if the cup is hot? Surely we mean a cup of hot coffee…
A One night stand – Guess who is standing?? That also whole one night!!!
To sleep with someone – Can you believe that someone will be sleeping while sleeping with someone?
Extraordinary – If extra large means larger then large, extra fine means finer than fine, then I would say extraordinary means MORE ORDINARY THAN ORDINARY.
Preplan, preheat, prerecord - Don’t you think that the prefix 'pre' adds no meaning here? Any way, you are simply planning, heating or recording, and these all have to be done in advance.
Skinny – If fatty means full of fat, shouldn’t skinny mean full of skin??
'They do the things behind my back!' – So you expect them to do the things in front of your back!!
Neither is a restroom a room to rest nor a toilet a room to toil....hmmm.... unless if one is constipated!!


Thank God for confusing languages; it makes life more fun and enjoyable.

CWH
07-23-2011, 06:16 AM
What an English poem!...

When the English tongue we speak.
Why is break not rhymed with freak?
Will you tell me why it's true
We say sew but likewise few?
And the maker of the verse,
Cannot rhyme his horse with worse?
Beard is not the same as heard
Cord is different from word.
Cow is cow but low is low
Shoe is never rhymed with foe.
Think of hose, dose, and lose
And think of goose and yet with choose
Think of comb, tomb and bomb,
Doll and roll or home and some.
Since pay is rhymed with say
Why not paid with said I pray?
Think of blood, food and good.
Mould is not pronounced like could.
Wherefore done, but gone and lone -
Is there any reason known?
To sum up all, it seems to me
Sound and letters don't agree.

Eye halve a spelling checker
It came with my pea sea
It plainly marques for my revue
Miss steaks eye kin knot sea.
Eye strike a key and type a word
And weight four it to say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me strait a weigh.
As soon as a mist ache is maid
It nose bee fore two long
And eye can put the error rite
It's rare lea ever wrong.
Eye have run this poem threw it
Eye am shore your pleased two no
It's letter perfect awl the weigh
My checker tolled me sew.
Margo Roark.


God save the English language! Amen.

Richard Amiel McGough
07-23-2011, 07:44 AM
Funny poem. Too true! Thanks for sharing. :thumb:

CWH
07-30-2011, 07:39 AM
I guess the Chinese find English difficult:

Chinglish

In a Beijing hotel lobby:
"The lift is being fixed for next day. During that time we regret that you will be unbearable."

In a Shanghai hotel elevator:
"Please leave your values at the front desk."

In a Hangzhou hotel:
"The flattening of underwear with pleasure is the job of the chambermaid."

In a Jilin hotel:
"You are very invited to take advantage of the chambermaid."

In a Wuxi dry-cleaner:
"Please drop your trousers here for best results."

Outside a Tianjin clothing shop:
"Order your summer suits quick. Because of big rush we will execute customers in strict rotation."

In a Xian tailor shop:
"Ladies may have a fit upstairs."

In a Guilin hotel:
"Because of impropriety of entertaining guests of the opposite sex in the bedroom, it is suggested that the lobby be used for this purpose."

An ad by a Kunming dentist:
"Teeth extracted by the latest methodists."

In a Hangzhou zoo:
"Please do not feed animals. If you have suitable food, give it to the guard on duty."

From a karaoke bar song list in Suzhou:
"I'd Like to Teach the Wound to Sing" and "What Kind of Foot Am I?"

In a Taiyuan bar:
"Special cocktails for the ladies with nuts."

Hainan airline ticket office:
"We take your bags and send them in all directions."

In a Huashan temple:
"It is forbidden to enter a woman. Even a foreigner if dressed as a man."

In a Kunming Buddhist temple:
"Please don´t make confusing noise while chanting"
and
"Please don´t be crowded"

In Shaoshan all over the place:
"Visit in civilization"


A sign in English outside Beijing gardens admonishes us that
"Decadent songs and actions that go against decency are not allowed here."

Street signs uplift as in "Carry oneself with civilisation, friendship and unition of all peoples."
They encourage us to "Pay attention to the sanitation" and to "Do lustre to the environment."

Hotel Chinglish, a pamphlet in English advises, "Guests must not get up other guests before breakfast" and similarly,
"Guests must not come in their rooms after 11pm."
It's reassuring, however, because the place is also described as an "Hygenically recommendable institution. No pets, combustible or explodable."

Among the hotel rules are Rules Number 29-30, "Tenants are not permitted to bring cattle or live fowls."
They appear not to draw the line at sheep or goats.

Store Chinglish, it's reassuring to know that one's personal possessions, if left in the local Bag-Keeping Office, will be safe'n'sound.
A Notice-to-customers outlines the services provided:
1. Only keep bigger bags and cases.
2. Don't keep cash, cheques as well as precious articles.
3. Don't keep dangerous easy broken and inflammables, and
4. Don't look after any articles.


I guess God has some humor when He confused the world's languages!... Alleluia!

Richard Amiel McGough
08-02-2011, 11:20 AM
This "Fun and Games" thread got diverted into a serious discussion about Evolution, Creationism, the Bible, and the Tower of Babel (http://biblewheel.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2366) so I created a new thread by that name. Click the link to continue the conversation.

RAM (As Administrator)

CWH
08-03-2011, 09:01 AM
If English is easy, think again:

Western Europe
Cocktail lounge, Norway: LADIES ARE REQUESTED NOT TO HAVE CHILDREN IN THE BAR.

Hotel, Vienna: IN CASE OF FIRE, DO YOUR UTMOST TO ALARM THE HOTEL PORTER.

Doctor's office, Rome: SPECIALIST IN WOMEN AND OTHER DISEASES.

A laundry in Rome: LADIES, LEAVE YOUR CLOTHES HERE AND SPEND THE AFTERNOON HAVING A GOOD TIME.

In an Italian cemetery: PERSONS ARE PROHIBITED FROM PICKING FLOWERS FROM ANY BUT THEIR OWN GRAVES.

Hotel brochure, Italy: THIS HOTEL IS RENOWNED FOR ITS PEACE AND SOLITUDE. IN FACT, CROWDS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD FLOCK HERE TO ENJOY ITS SOLITUDE.

In a Swiss Mountain inn: SPECIAL TODAY - NO ICE-CREAM.

On the menu of a Swiss restaurant: OUR WINES LEAVE YOU NOTHING TO HOPE FOR.

A sign posted in Germany's Black Forest: IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN ON OUR BLACK FOREST CAMPING SITE THAT PEOPLE OF DIFFERENT SEX, FOR INSTANCE, MEN AND WOMEN, LIVE TOGETHER IN ONE TENT UNLESS THEY ARE MARRIED WITH EACH OTHER FOR THIS PURPOSE.

A sign seen on an automatic restroom hand dryer in Germany: DO NOT ACTIVATE WITH WET HANDS.

On the grounds of a private school in Scotland: NO TRESPASSING WITHOUT PERMISSION.

Eastern Europe

In the lobby of a Moscow hotel across from a Russian Orthodox monastery: YOU ARE WELCOME TO VISIT THE CEMETERY WHERE FAMOUS RUSSIAN AND SOVIET COMPOSERS, ARTISTS, AND WRITERS ARE BURIED DAILY EXCEPT THURSDAY.

Hotel catering to skiers, Austria: NOT TO PERAMBULATE THE CORRIDORS IN THE HOURS OF REPOSE IN THE BOOTS OF ASCENSION.

Taken from a menu, Poland: SALAD A FIRM'S OWN MAKE; LIMPID RED BEET SOUP WITH CHEESY DUMPLINGS IN THE FORM OF A FINGER; ROASTED DUCK LET LOOSE; BEEF RASHERS BEATEN IN THE COUNTRY PEOPLE'S FASHION.

From the "Soviet Weekly": HERE WILL BE A MOSCOW EXHIBITION OF ARTS BY 15,000 SOVIET REPUBLIC PAINTERS AND SCULPTORS. THESE WERE EXECUTED OVER THE PAST TWO YEARS.

On the door of a Moscow hotel room: IF THIS IS YOUR FIRST VISIT TO THE USSR, YOU ARE WELCOME TO IT.

Tourist agency, Czechoslovakia: TAKE ONE OF OUR HORSE-DRIVEN CITY TOURS. WE GUARANTEE NO MISCARRIAGES.

Australia & New Zealand (say, don't they speak English there?)
On a poster in Sydney : ARE YOU AN ADULT THAT CANNOT READ? IF SO, WE CAN HELP.

In a New Zealand restaurant: OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK, AND WEEKENDS TOO.

On a highway sign in Australia: TAKE NOTICE: WHEN THIS SIGN IS UNDER WATER; THIS ROAD IS IMPASSABLE.

Far East
NEW ADDITIONS FROM CHINA

In 2002, a sign in front of a rock garden in the Forbidden City in Beijing warned tourists: PLEASE DO NOT CLIMB THE ROCKETRY.

Sign over the information booth in a Beijing railroad station: QUESTION AUTHORITY

Included with the package of complimentary wares in a Chinese hotel was a pair of workout shorts marked: UNCOMPLIMENTARY PANTS.

A paragliding site near Beijing has a sign that reads: SITE OF JUMPING UMBRELLA.

The translation of the Ethnic Minorities Park in Beijing for a long time was RACIST PARK.

Road closed with a signboard : "Road Closed for No Fucking Reason".

A Big Signboard on a StarBucks restaurant in China: "StarFucks".

—From the BBC News (http://news.bbc.co.uk:80/2/hi/asia-pacific/6052800.stm); brought to our attention by Susan Lister.

Supermarket, Hong Kong: FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE, WE RECOMMEND COURTEOUS, EFFICIENT SELF-SERVICE.

An advertisement by a Hong Kong dentist: TEETH EXTRACTED BY THE LATEST METHODISTS.

The box of a clockwork toy made in Hong Kong: GUARANTEED TO WORK THROUGHOUT ITS USEFUL LIFE.

Booklet about using a hotel air conditioner, Japan: COOLES AND HEATES; IF YOU WANT CONDITION OF WARM AIR IN YOUR ROOM, PLEASE CONTROL YOURSELF.

Translated from Japanese to English and included in the instructions for a soap bubble gun: WHILE SOLUTION IS NOT TOXIC IT WILL NOT MAKE CHILD EDIBLE.

Tokyo hotel's rules and regulations: GUESTS ARE REQUESTED NOT TO SMOKE OR DO OTHER DISGUSTING BEHAVIORS IN BED.

Car rental brochure, Tokyo: WHEN PASSENGER OF FOOT HEAVE IN SIGHT, TOOTLE THE HORN. TRUMPET HIM MELODIOUSLY AT FIRST, BUT IF HE STILL OBSTACLES YOUR PASSAGE THEN TOOTLE HIM WITH VIGOUR.

Hotel room notice, Chiang-Mai, Thailand: PLEASE DO NOT BRING SOLICITORS INTO YOUR ROOM.

Africa
In an East African newspaper: A NEW SWIMMING POOL IS RAPIDLY TAKING SHAPE SINCE THE CONTRACTORS HAVE THROWN IN THE BULK OF THEIR WORKERS.

In a Nairobi restaurant: CUSTOMERS WHO FIND OUR WAITRESSES RUDE OUGHT TO SEE THE MANAGER.

On a South African building: MENTAL HEALTH PREVENTION CENTRE.

In a South African maternity ward: NO CHILDREN ALLOWED.

Mexico and South America
Hotel, Acapulco: THE MANAGER HAS PERSONALLY PASSED ALL THE WATER SERVED HERE.

Author: Unknown / Contributor: Deane Rothenmaier (most items)
Discovered by Susan Lister:
In a restaurant window: "DON'T STAND THERE AND BE HUNGRY. COME ON IN AND GET FED UP."

NEW: Translator Brett Jocelyn Epstein's favorite menu entries:
A rasher of joints
Duck with dry fruits and jewels
Well-hung meat (aged?)
Cloudberry consume


:lol:Laughter is the Best Medicine; but who created laughter? God! Amen :pray:

CWH
10-08-2011, 10:27 AM
Another humorous English dialogue...He is Me, I am You... Have a look:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dU4lYcN6zEY&feature=related

So is English dialogue easy?

Richard Amiel McGough
10-08-2011, 11:05 AM
Another humorous English dialogue...He is Me, I am You... Have a look:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dU4lYcN6zEY&feature=related

So is English dialogue easy?
:hysterical:

:signthankspin:

CWH
10-08-2011, 08:24 PM
Another humorous English dialogue...He is Me, I am You... Have a look:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dU4lYcN6zEY&feature=related

So is English dialogue easy?

Thanks RAM, and that is exactly what is happening in this forum and in many other forums.

Sounds familiar isn't it? I Am Who I Am.


Many God Blessings to all. Amen. :pray:

Richard Amiel McGough
10-08-2011, 08:28 PM
Thanks RAM, and that is exactly what is happening in this forum and in many other forums.

Sounds familiar isn't it? I Am Who I Am.


Many God Blessings to all. Amen. :pray:
I think you are right - that is what often happens on forums. People don't understand each other but think they do so the start yelling when the other person responds in a totally unexpected way. It's funny in small doses, but pretty tedious if it happens over and over and over again with no resolution.

Guido Fawkes
10-08-2014, 01:57 AM
It's been a while since this post has had any comments:

Why is it that we drive on a parkway and park in a driveway?

Why do you recite at a play but you play at a recital?

Why do we ship by truck and send cargo by ship?

Why do feet smell and noses run?

How can a SLIM CHANCE and a FAT CHANCE be the same, while a WISE MAN and a WISE GUY are opposites?

Why is QUITE A FEW the same as QUITE A LOT?

Why do we put SUITS in a Garment Bag, and put Garments in a Suitcase?

IF "Con" is the Opposite of "Pro", is CONGRESS the opposite of PROGRESS?

For that matter is CONGRESS the same as REGRESS?

If a mute swears, does his mother wash his hands with soap?

If a stealth bomber crashes in a forest and no one is around to hear it, will it make a sound?

If a man speaks in the forest and there is no woman to hear him, is he still wrong?

If vegetarians eat vegetables, what do humanitarians eat?

What do you call a defective Milk Dud?

How come abbreviated is such a long word?

If it's zero degrees outside today and it's supposed to be twice as cold tomorrow, how cold is it going to be?

Why are they called apartments, when they're all stuck together?

Why are there 5 syllables in the word "monosyllabic"?

If women wear a pair of pants, a pair of glasses, and a pair of ear-rings, why don't they wear a pair of bras?

If white wine goes with cooked fish, do white grapes go with sushi?

If olive oil comes from olives where does baby oil come from?

If a book about failures doesn't sell, is it a success?