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  1. #1
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    Meaning and the Bible Wheel

    Beyond probabilities

    What is it that takes the Bible Wheel beyond the realm of probabilities and chance…..it is simply that it has 'Meaning'. Anytime a happening is given meaning, the calculations to determine its chance of occurring goes off the chart. No longer can mere probability calculations be used to determine the reason for its existence. This is where the Bible Wheel stands.

    In this article I want to focus on just one of the many significant 'Divine Fingerprints' found in the Bible Wheel……I will call this 'Synoptic Anomalies'. It is where the occurrence of a word is found only in one of the parallel passages of the synoptic Gospels (Matt., Mark and Luke). But this is only the beginning, not only does the unique word used set it apart….but the meaning of the word itself ties intimately to the meaning of the Hebrew letter that defines the theme of the spoke which it heads.

    One of the many outstanding examples which Richard has written about in detail in his book 'The Bible Wheel' is on spoke 18. The Hebrew letter that governs spoke 18, is Tzaddi צ the 18th letter. The meaning of the letter Tzaddi is righteousness, which is well established in the Alphabetic Psalms, especially in Psalm 119.
    137) TZADDIRighteous (צדיק) art thou, O LORD, and upright are thy judgments.

    138) Thy testimonies that thou hast commanded are righteous (צדק) and very faithful.

    139) My zeal hath consumed me, because mine enemies have forgotten thy words.

    140) Thy word is very pure: therefore thy servant loveth it.

    141) I am small and despised: yet do not I forget thy precepts

    142) Thy righteousness(צדקתך) is an everlasting righteousness (צדק), and thy law is the truth.

    143) Trouble and anguish have taken hold on me: yet thy commandments are my delights.

    144) The righteousness (צדק) of thy testimonies is everlasting: give me understanding, and I shall live.
    This example of 'Righteousness' shines brilliantly in the book of Matthew on spoke 18. In some of the parallel passages between the book of Matthew and the book of Luke the word 'Righteousness' appears in the passages of Matthew, and is mysteriously absent in the parallel passages of Luke. This gives 'Meaning' to the insertion of the word righteousness in Matt., since that is the meaning of the letter that governs the spoke. It is therefore nothing less than the Fingerprint of God imbedded in His Word.
    Matt. 5:6 Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.
    Luke 6:21 Blessed are ye that hunger now: for ye shall be filled. Blessed are ye that weep now: for ye shall laugh.

    Matt. 5:10 Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness' sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
    Luke 6:22 Blessed are ye, when men shall hate you, and when they shall separate you from their company, and shall reproach you, and cast out your name as evil, for the Son of man's sake.
    Matt. 6:33 But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you.
    Luke 12:31 But rather seek ye the kingdom of God; and all these things shall be added unto you.

    Matt. 10:41 He that receiveth a prophet in the name of a prophet shall receive a prophet's reward; and he that receiveth a righteous man in the name of a righteousman shall receive a righteous man's reward.
    Luke 9:48 And said unto them, Whosoever shall receive this child in my name receiveth me: and whosoever shall receive me receiveth him that sent me: for he that is least among you all, the same shall be great.

    Matt. 13:17 For verily I say unto you, That many prophets and righteousmen have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not seen them; and to hear those things which ye hear, and have not heard them.
    Luke 10:24 For I tell you, that many prophets and kings have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not seen them; and to hear those things which ye hear, and have not heard them.

    Matt. 23:35 That upon you may come all the righteous blood shed upon the earth, from the blood of righteousAbel unto the blood of Zacharias son of Barachias, whom ye slew between the temple and the altar.
    Luke 11:50 That the blood of all the prophets, which was shed from the foundation of the world, may be required of this generation;

    Matt. 23:29 Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! because ye build the tombs of the prophets, and garnish the sepulchres of the righteous,
    Luke 11:47 Woe unto you! for ye build the sepulchres of the prophets, and your fathers killed them.
    God Bless,

    Rose
    Never trust anything you are afraid to question ~

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  2. #2
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    You really got the heart of the point here, Rose. It is the meaning that makes so much of a difference. Coincidences happen. But this cannot be just a "coincidence" by any means. The emphasis that Matthew places upon the theme of righteousness "just happens" to be the meaning of the corresponding letter on the Bible Wheel. It is right on target.

    And righteousness is not the only theme that integrate the Gospels with the letters that govern them. It goes on and on and on. For example, Luke is governed by Resh, and the Acrostics reveal an important KeyWord that begins with Resh:
    Psa 119:156 Great are thy tender mercies (racham), O LORD.
    In which Gospel do we read about God's tender mercies? Luke!
    Luk 1:78 Through the tender mercy of our God; whereby the dayspring from on high hath visited us.
    Luke mentions many exclusive episodes of Christ's life and teachings where mercy is mentioned! The other Gospels don't even touch upon these episodes, like the parable of the Good Samaritan, the rich man and Lazarus story, the healing of the ten lepers and the parable of the publican and the Pharisee. In all these, the theme of mercy comes to the fore!

    Consider, for example, how the theme of mercy in Luke is contrasted with the theme of righteousness in Matthew. Matthew uses a word that is strongly linked to righteous in one of Jesus' sayings:
    Mat 5:48 Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect.
    But what is Luke's word choice?
    Luk 6:36 Be ye therefore merciful, as your Father also is merciful.
    Can it be just a coincidence? I'm yet to find a person who can even attempt to begin refuting this. They run away and stay quiet.

    Victor

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post


    Consider, for example, how the theme of mercy in Luke is contrasted with the theme of righteousness in Matthew. Matthew uses a word that is strongly linked to righteous in one of Jesus' sayings:
    Mat 5:48 Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect.

    But what is Luke's word choice?
    Luk 6:36 Be ye therefore merciful, as your Father also is merciful.
    Can it be just a coincidence? I'm yet to find a person who can even attempt to begin refuting this. They run away and stay quiet.

    Victor
    Coincidence? Impossible! There really is no end to the wonder here revealed. A quick internet search confirms that the correlation between the Gospel of Luke and the idea of "mercy" (racham) is objective and confirmed by independent witness. Consider this article from this website devoted to the concept of God's mercy:

    http://thedivinemercy.org

    St. Luke: The Gospel of Mercy

    One gospel in particular, the Gospel According to St. Luke, has traditionally merited the title "the Gospel of Mercy." First of all, the theme of God's merciful love really ties the whole book together from beginning to end: Mercy is its "leitmotif," one might say. Secondly, the gospel contains a cluster of parables in chapter 15 which are unique to St. Luke's gospel, and which especially highlight the merciful love of God. Finally, St. Luke places special emphasis on the universal scope of Divine Mercy, portraying it as a distinctive characteristic of the Kingdom of God dawning upon the world through Jesus Christ.

    Let us begin with a look at how the theme of God's merciful love runs through the entire book.

    In its opening chapter, St. Luke's gospel begins with two great canticles in praise of Divine Mercy: the Magnificat and the Benedictus. The Magnificat is essentially a hymn of thanksgiving to the God of hesed-mercy: A god of steadfast love and faithfulness. In verses 46-50, for example, Mary praises God for showering His mercy upon her
    Here is another example:

    A second distinctive feature of Luke's portrayal of Jesus is his presentation of Jesus as compassionate and merciful. Early in the gospel the Canticle of Mary (the Magnificat) indicates that God is acting now because "he has remembered his promise of mercy . . . Of Zechariah makes clear, "tender mercy" of God "promised through the holy prophets of old" and sworn "to our father Abraham" is a promise of "redemption" and a "horn of salvation" (1:68-79). For Luke "mercy" means "salvation." Jesus, born "within the house of David," is the fulfillment of that ancient promise.
    I could continue with such documentation without limit. The revelation of the Bible Wheel is like a ten thousand watt neon sign. None but the willfully ignorant could fail to see the glory it reveals.

    Richard
    • Skepticism is the antiseptic of the mind.
    • Remember why we debate. We have nothing to lose but the errors we hold. Who but a stubborn fool would hold to errors once they have been exposed?

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  4. #4
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    Hi Richard and all,

    I havent looked at the Bible wheel except to glance at it once or twice.
    I was going to ask if you lined up the 22 segments or the 119th Psalm but I see you are way ahead of me there.
    Also the 22 paths on the Tree of Life and there corespondences including Tarot cards would most likely show a lot. You have to add ten to each though as the ten Sephiroth are considered "Paths" also. But "objective paths". The 22 paths are "subjective."
    So, for instance the third letter, Gimel would go on the 13th path. This is the path from Tipareth the "Christ center" to Kether the Crown. The Tarot card is the High Priestess.

    Also have you seen whether or not the Jewish festivals line up with the radial lines on your wheel. In other words divide the wheel in degrees (or 13 months) and see if those pie shaped segments line up with the wheel the same as the month and day that each festival falls within the year.
    The book of John really seems to follow the festivals closely.

  5. #5
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    Hi Rose,

    I am trying to understand your meaning. Why does the insertion of the word "tsadik" become meaningful?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by falasha View Post
    Hi Rose,

    I am trying to understand your meaning. Why does the insertion of the word "tsadik" become meaningful?
    Hi Falasha,

    The insertion of "tzadik" in Matthew is significant because it follows the alphabetic pattern that God established in the Alphabetic Verses. These kinds of correlations are evidence that God designed the entire Bible on the same alphabetic pattern that He used in the design of the Alphabetic Verses. It is particularly significant that Psalm 119 is all about the Word of God and it praises the Word of God from Aleph to Tav, the first and last letters of the Hebrew Alphabet. This corresponds to the revelation of Jesus Christ, the living Word of God, as the Alpha and Omega.

    Richard
    • Skepticism is the antiseptic of the mind.
    • Remember why we debate. We have nothing to lose but the errors we hold. Who but a stubborn fool would hold to errors once they have been exposed?

    Check out my blog site

  7. #7
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    Hello Falasha,

    I would add the following: have a good look at the Bible Wheel. You'll see that Matthew falls on the Spoke governed by Tsaddi. It is Spoke 18 of the Bible Wheel. And we know that Matthew has a lot on tsadik, the theme of righteousness. So the letters of the Alphabet dictate the themes of the Bible Books!

    And this goes for all 66 Books!

    Please ask any questions you may have.

  8. #8
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    Tsade

    But there is no corresponding letter "tsade" in English or Greek.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by falasha View Post
    But there is no corresponding letter "tsade" in English or Greek.
    Hi Falasha,

    That is correct. The pattern is established by the 22 Hebrew letters. The meanings of these letters are established in the KeyWords that God placed in the Alphabetic Verses, such as tzedeq (rightiousness) in the verses corresponding to the 18th letter Tzaddi. This then correlates with themes of the books found on Spoke 18 - Job, Matthew, 1 John.

    Ricahrd
    • Skepticism is the antiseptic of the mind.
    • Remember why we debate. We have nothing to lose but the errors we hold. Who but a stubborn fool would hold to errors once they have been exposed?

    Check out my blog site

  10. #10
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    Tsade

    So the Bible Wheel is only relevant to Hebrew?

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