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Thread: Spoke 1 - God

  1. #1
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    Spoke 1 - God

    Have you noticed that some books of the bible show more biblical figures interacting but with rare mentions of God...except for Genesis?

    When Cain killed Abel God speaks to Cain. But in any other book, when one kills another God doesn't speak to the murderer.

    God Elohim seems maximized in Genesis 1.

    Esther on the other hand doesn't mention God at all (I wonder if there are any chapter of Spoke 17 where there is no mention of God?)

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by gilgal View Post
    Have you noticed that some books of the bible show more biblical figures interacting but with rare mentions of God...except for Genesis?

    When Cain killed Abel God speaks to Cain. But in any other book, when one kills another God doesn't speak to the murderer.

    God Elohim seems maximized in Genesis 1.

    Esther on the other hand doesn't mention God at all (I wonder if there are any chapter of Spoke 17 where there is no mention of God?)
    The word "God" in the KJV is maximized on Spoke 1, but it is not statistically significant because very similar counts appear on Spoke 5 (because of many hits in Deut) and Spoke 19 (because of Psalms). But it is interesting that the hits on Cycle 3 are strongly maximized in Romans (Spoke 1). Also, we find consistently high counts across all three cycles only on Spoke 1 and Spoke 2.

    But the simple word count does not reveal the themes that characterize Spoke 1 because God is a very common word throughout the Bible. A good example of a strong thematic correlation that is revealed by word counts is seen in the theme of "creation" as discussed here:



    As for Spoke 17 ~ that is a most fascinating example. There is no reference to God at all in Esther, the first book on that Spoke. This coheres powerfully with the them of the 17th letter Peh as discussed in the Spoke 17 articles (e.g. here). This is clearly manifest in the distribution of the word "God" which is minimized on Spoke 17. Indeed, even 2 Peter on Cycle 3 has only 7 hits, whereas the adjacent books of 1 Peter (written by the same author) has 35 and 1 John has 41! This is a very strong coherence.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAM View Post
    As for Spoke 17 ~ that is a most fascinating example. There is no reference to God at all in Esther, the first book on that Spoke. This coheres powerfully with the them of the 17th letter Peh as discussed in the Spoke 17 articles (e.g. here). This is clearly manifest in the distribution of the word "God" which is minimized on Spoke 17. Indeed, even 2 Peter on Cycle 3 has only 7 hits, whereas the adjacent books of 1 Peter (written by the same author) has 35 and 1 John has 41! This is a very strong coherence.
    What about on the chapter level? You mentioned that Acts 17 mentions the Unknown God.

    There's an error on the page:
    אור Emunah: Faith
    אמונה Aur: Light
    It should be:
    אור Aur: Light
    אמונה Emunah: Faith
    Last edited by gilgal; 11-23-2010 at 05:29 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Watson, Miami, FL View Post
    Gilgal,

    You are correct. The first book of the Bible has an anthropomorphic God: 'God' appears in human form several times! This only occurs in the Hebrew Bible in Genesis. Now when the Christian Testament begins, we now have Jesus as God incarnate, right? This is quite a question! Jews maintain their dogma that for Y'shua ben Yosef to refer to himself as God was heresy, because for them, then and today, 'God' can not be a human. Yet, this is clearly in direct conflict with the text of Genesis. :eek: Rabbis don't like to be questioned about this.
    If you look at Genesis 19 and Judges 19 Sodom and Gomorrah and the tribe of Benjamin had a lot in common, being homosexuals. God dealt with Sodom and Gomorrah but he let the Israelites deal with the tribe of Benjamin:
    Words Searched For:
    1. do not so wickedly +
    2. that we may know
    Genesis 19
    5 And they called unto Lot, and said unto him, Where are the men which came in to thee this night? bring them out unto us, that we may know them.
    7 And said, I pray you, brethren, do not so wickedly.

    Judges 19
    22 Now as they were making their hearts merry, behold, the men of the city, certain sons of Belial, beset the house round about, and beat at the door, and spake to the master of the house, the old man, saying, Bring forth the man that came into thine house, that we may know him.
    23 And the man, the master of the house, went out unto them, and said unto them, Nay, my brethren, nay, I pray you, do not so wickedly; seeing that this man is come into mine house, do not this folly.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Watson, Miami, FL View Post
    Gilgal,

    You are correct. The first book of the Bible has an anthropomorphic God: 'God' appears in human form several times! This only occurs in the Hebrew Bible in Genesis. Now when the Christian Testament begins, we now have Jesus as God incarnate, right? This is quite a question! Jews maintain their dogma that for Y'shua ben Yosef to refer to himself as God was heresy, because for them, then and today, 'God' can not be a human. Yet, this is clearly in direct conflict with the text of Genesis. Rabbis don't like to be questioned about this.
    Why do you say that God is anthropomorphic only in Genesis? He is presented that way in the Psalms, in Isaiah, and throughout the OT. For example:
    Isaiah 40:10 Behold, the Lord GOD will come with strong hand, and his arm shall rule for him: behold, his reward is with him, and his work before him. 11 He shall feed his flock like a shepherd: he shall gather the lambs with his arm, and carry them in his bosom, and shall gently lead those that are with young.
    ... hand, arm, bosom, shepherd ... very anthropomorphic.
    • Skepticism is the antiseptic of the mind.
    • Remember why we debate. We have nothing to lose but the errors we hold. Who but a stubborn fool would hold to errors once they have been exposed?

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAM View Post
    Why do you say that God is anthropomorphic only in Genesis? He is presented that way in the Psalms, in Isaiah, and throughout the OT. For example:
    Isaiah 40:10 Behold, the Lord GOD will come with strong hand, and his arm shall rule for him: behold, his reward is with him, and his work before him. 11 He shall feed his flock like a shepherd: he shall gather the lambs with his arm, and carry them in his bosom, and shall gently lead those that are with young.
    ... hand, arm, bosom, shepherd ... very anthropomorphic.
    Nice one! But Isaiah is also Spoke 1.

  7. #7
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    Back in January I was listening to a lecture from N.T. Wright and he mentioned the fact that in the Epistle to the Romans there is a greater number of references to"God" than any other Epistle. This prompted me to investigate more and it was simple to find that "God" is maximized on Spoke 1! I wrote an article about it back then but never published.

    But I have just posted it now on the forum: Aleph teaches: God comes FIRST!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    Back in January I was listening to a lecture from N.T. Wright and he mentioned the fact that in the Epistle to the Romans there is a greater number of references to"God" than any other Epistle. This prompted me to investigate more and it was simple to find that "God" is maximized on Spoke 1! I wrote an article about it back then but never published.

    But I have just posted it now on the forum: Aleph teaches: God comes FIRST!
    That's what I always enjoyed about reading commentaries in light of the Bible Wheel. The commentators invariable drop little comments that would "just happen" to fit perfectly. The prominence of "God" in Romans is striking. It occurs there 50% more than in any other book. Their are 163 hits in Romans. The next largest are 1 Cor (103), Rev (99), 2 Cor (74), Heb (72), 1Joh (64), and all others < 40.
    • Skepticism is the antiseptic of the mind.
    • Remember why we debate. We have nothing to lose but the errors we hold. Who but a stubborn fool would hold to errors once they have been exposed?

    Check out my blog site

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAM View Post
    That's what I always enjoyed about reading commentaries in light of the Bible Wheel. The commentators invariable drop little comments that would "just happen" to fit perfectly. The prominence of "God" in Romans is striking. It occurs there 50% more than in any other book. Their are 163 hits in Romans. The next largest are 1 Cor (103), Rev (99), 2 Cor (74), Heb (72), 1Joh (64), and all others < 40.
    But the thing about Genesis is that, at least from chapters 1-11, the story seems narrated from God's view point, how God dealt with us:
    Genesis 1:God=> creation;
    Genesis 2:God=> Adam;
    Genesis 3:God => Adam, Eve, serpent;
    Genesis 4:God => Cain;
    Genesis 6:God => mankind;...

    But looking at the rest of Genesis God works through people.

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