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  1. #1
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    At the feet of Jesus (Spoke 20 - Luke)



    Our God assumed a human nature when He came to earth and thus literally possessed a body of flesh and bones. As we know, this is the doctrine of the Incarnation. Interestingly, different aspects of the Incarnation were emphasized by the distinctions among the Four Gospels. The Gospel of Luke, for example, gives us a greater number of references to the feet of Jesus. Check the graph:



    This fact integrates with the alphabetic structure of Scripture. Luke is governed by the letter Resh, and the Hebrew word for foot/feet is Regel, a Resh KeyWord! It is found for example in Nahum 1:15:
    Nah 1:15 Behold upon the mountains the feet [regel] of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace!
    The feet of Christ are referenced many times in the Gospel of Luke. Although the other three Evangelists have a few exclusive references to Christ’s feet, Luke has much more than all the others combined!

    For example, in one single account the feet of Jesus are referenced seven times!
    Luke 7:37 And, behold, a woman in the city, which was a sinner, when she knew that Jesus sat at meat in the Pharisee's house, brought an alabaster box of ointment, 38 And stood at his feet behind him weeping, and began to wash his feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment. 44 And he turned to the woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this woman? I entered into thine house, thou gavest me no water for my feet: but she hath washed my feet with tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head. 45 Thou gavest me no kiss: but this woman since the time I came in hath not ceased to kiss my feet. 46 My head with oil thou didst not anoint: but this woman hath anointed my feet with ointment. 47 Wherefore I say unto thee, Her sins, which are many, are forgiven; for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little.


    This account is found only in Luke. There was a similar event narrated by John, but the mention of Jesus' feet is laconic:
    John 12:3 Then took Mary a pound of ointment of spikenard, very costly, and anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her hair: and the house was filled with the odour of the ointment.
    And that is that. No other details are given.

    This is a very striking pattern. It goes on in other passages. For example, once again only Luke records an incident with the sisters Mary and Martha.
    Luke 10:39 And she [Martha] had a sister called Mary, which also sat at Jesus' feet, and heard his word.


    What a beautiful and exclusive Lukan image: Mary sitting 'at Jesus’ feet,' in a position of a student who learns at the feet of her Master!

    Similarly, the account of the ten lepers that were healed by Christ is exclusively found in Luke:
    Luke 17:15-16 And one of them, when he saw that he was healed, turned back, and with a loud voice glorified God, and fell down on hisface at his feet, giving him thanks: and he was a Samaritan.


    Here it is one more time! No other Evangelist records this event. Additionally, I could say that the text quoted above also mentions two other Resh KeyWords that are distinctively Lukan: to see, Ra’ah, and to heal, Rapha ('he saw that he was healed').

    But this pattern gets even more interesting when we compare parallel passages in the Gospels. See the example of the healing of the Gerasene demoniac. The three Synoptics record the event. Matthew doesn’t include the last portion of the acount which describes the condition of the ex-demoniac. The following comparison is thus limited to Mark and Luke:
    Mark 5:15 And they come to Jesus, and see him that was possessed with the devil, and had the legion, sitting, and clothed, and in his right mind: and they were afraid.

    Luke 8:35 Then they went out to see what was done; and came to Jesus, and found the man, out of whom the devils were departed, sitting at the feet of Jesus, clothed, and in his right mind: and they were afraid.


    Luke deliberately adds the phrase 'at the feet of Jesus'! Unlike the others, he describes the healed man as a disciple sitting at the feet of Wisdom Himself!

    But there’s more. Consider the next example:
    Matthew 9:18 While he spake these things unto them, behold, there came a certain ruler, and worshipped him, saying, My daughter is even now dead: but come and lay thy hand upon her, and she shall live.
    Luk 8:41 And, behold, there came a man named Jairus, and he was a ruler of the synagogue: and he fell down at Jesus' feet, and besought him that he would come into his house.


    Matthew omits the reference to 'Jesus’ feet' and Luke, once again, adds it.

    There’s a final mention of Jesus’ feet in the Third Gospel. Luke is the only one to record that, after the resurrection, Christ showed to the disciples not only His hands but also His feet!
    Luk 24:39 Behold my hands and my feet, that it is I myself: handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see me have.
    Luk 24:40 And when he had thus spoken, he shewed them his hands and his feet.


    John records that Christ showed His hands to them, but not His feet. (20:20) Luke is the one who adds the reference to the feet!

    This brings us back to the central theme of the Gospels: the Incarnation. Christ showed His body of flesh and bones to His disciples so that they could believe He was alive and that He was really human. He showed even His feet – a seemingly secondary detail – to provide the fullest possible evidence.

    Scripture self-reflects the Incarnation of our Lord. Just like He was fully human and fully divine, the Bible was produced both by man and by God in an inseparable way. The different Evangelists provided minor distinctions in their respective accounts of Christ’s life. And these little distinguishing features, like the references to the feet of Jesus in Luke, provide strong evidence of the Divine origin and design of Scripture. The Hebrew word for Feet begins with the same letter that symbolically distinguishes the Gospel of Luke on the Bible Wheel! Just like the Incarnate Word provided proof, so does the Inspired Word!

    Oh, behold the feet of the Lord in the Gospel of Luke! Let us ever learn and worship before the pierced feet of Jesus Christ!


  2. #2
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    Glory be to God who reveals such things to His children!

    I will comment more as time permits - but I must say that this article is extremely well done and profound. Thank you Victor.

    Richard

    PS: Reading your article gave me "Holy Goosebumps"!
    • Skepticism is the antiseptic of the mind.
    • Remember why we debate. We have nothing to lose but the errors we hold. Who but a stubborn fool would hold to errors once they have been exposed?

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post


    Our God assumed a human nature when He came to earth and thus literally possessed a body of flesh and bones. As we know, this is the doctrine of the Incarnation. Interestingly, different aspects of the Incarnation were emphasized by the distinctions among the Four Gospels. The Gospel of Luke, for example, gives us a greater number of references to the feet of Jesus. Check the graph:



    This fact integrates with the alphabetic structure of Scripture. Luke is governed by the letter Resh, and the Hebrew word for foot/feet is Regel, a Resh KeyWord! It is found for example in Nahum 1:15:
    Nah 1:15 Behold upon the mountains the feet [regel] of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace!
    The feet of Christ are referenced many times in the Gospel of Luke. Although the other three Evangelists have a few exclusive references to Christ’s feet, Luke has much more than all the others combined!

    For example, in one single account the feet of Jesus are referenced seven times!
    Luke 7:37 And, behold, a woman in the city, which was a sinner, when she knew that Jesus sat at meat in the Pharisee's house, brought an alabaster box of ointment, 38 And stood at his feet behind him weeping, and began to wash his feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment. 44 And he turned to the woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this woman? I entered into thine house, thou gavest me no water for my feet: but she hath washed my feet with tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head. 45 Thou gavest me no kiss: but this woman since the time I came in hath not ceased to kiss my feet. 46 My head with oil thou didst not anoint: but this woman hath anointed my feet with ointment. 47 Wherefore I say unto thee, Her sins, which are many, are forgiven; for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little.


    This account is found only in Luke. There was a similar event narrated by John, but the mention of Jesus' feet is laconic:
    John 12:3 Then took Mary a pound of ointment of spikenard, very costly, and anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her hair: and the house was filled with the odour of the ointment.
    And that is that. No other details are given.

    This is a very striking pattern. It goes on in other passages. For example, once again only Luke records an incident with the sisters Mary and Martha.
    Luke 10:39 And she [Martha] had a sister called Mary, which also sat at Jesus' feet, and heard his word.


    What a beautiful and exclusive Lukan image: Mary sitting 'at Jesus’ feet,' in a position of a student who learns at the feet of her Master!

    Similarly, the account of the ten lepers that were healed by Christ is exclusively found in Luke:
    Luke 17:15-16 And one of them, when he saw that he was healed, turned back, and with a loud voice glorified God, and fell down on hisface at his feet, giving him thanks: and he was a Samaritan.


    Here it is one more time! No other Evangelist records this event. Additionally, I could say that the text quoted above also mentions two other Resh KeyWords that are distinctively Lukan: to see, Ra’ah, and to heal, Rapha ('he saw that he was healed').

    But this pattern gets even more interesting when we compare parallel passages in the Gospels. See the example of the healing of the Gerasene demoniac. The three Synoptics record the event. Matthew doesn’t include the last portion of the acount which describes the condition of the ex-demoniac. The following comparison is thus limited to Mark and Luke:
    Mark 5:15 And they come to Jesus, and see him that was possessed with the devil, and had the legion, sitting, and clothed, and in his right mind: and they were afraid.

    Luke 8:35 Then they went out to see what was done; and came to Jesus, and found the man, out of whom the devils were departed, sitting at the feet of Jesus, clothed, and in his right mind: and they were afraid.


    Luke deliberately adds the phrase 'at the feet of Jesus'! Unlike the others, he describes the healed man as a disciple sitting at the feet of Wisdom Himself!

    But there’s more. Consider the next example:
    Matthew 9:18 While he spake these things unto them, behold, there came a certain ruler, and worshipped him, saying, My daughter is even now dead: but come and lay thy hand upon her, and she shall live.
    Luk 8:41 And, behold, there came a man named Jairus, and he was a ruler of the synagogue: and he fell down at Jesus' feet, and besought him that he would come into his house.


    Matthew omits the reference to 'Jesus’ feet' and Luke, once again, adds it.

    There’s a final mention of Jesus’ feet in the Third Gospel. Luke is the only one to record that, after the resurrection, Christ showed to the disciples not only His hands but also His feet!
    Luk 24:39 Behold my hands and my feet, that it is I myself: handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see me have.
    Luk 24:40 And when he had thus spoken, he shewed them his hands and his feet.


    John records that Christ showed His hands to them, but not His feet. (20:20) Luke is the one who adds the reference to the feet!

    This brings us back to the central theme of the Gospels: the Incarnation. Christ showed His body of flesh and bones to His disciples so that they could believe He was alive and that He was really human. He showed even His feet – a seemingly secondary detail – to provide the fullest possible evidence.

    Scripture self-reflects the Incarnation of our Lord. Just like He was fully human and fully divine, the Bible was produced both by man and by God in an inseparable way. The different Evangelists provided minor distinctions in their respective accounts of Christ’s life. And these little distinguishing features, like the references to the feet of Jesus in Luke, provide strong evidence of the Divine origin and design of Scripture. The Hebrew word for Feet begins with the same letter that symbolically distinguishes the Gospel of Luke on the Bible Wheel! Just like the Incarnate Word provided proof, so does the Inspired Word!

    Oh, behold the feet of the Lord in the Gospel of Luke! Let us ever learn and worship before the pierced feet of Jesus Christ!

    WOW!

    That is truly incredible! Last night Richard and I were just talking about how the Bible Wheel reveals connections in the Synoptic Gospels that would otherwise remain hidden, and we were speaking of all the connections that are probably still waiting to be discovered.....then guess what? You find this extremely significant connection with feet and the Gospel of Luke on the 20th Spoke, governed by the letter "Resh" which means "head". Linking together "feet" and "head" on the same Spoke.

    Rose
    Never trust anything you are afraid to question ~

    To know oneself is to know the universe...


    Live Fully...Love Extravagantly...For the sake of Goodness

    Be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves. Matt.10:16

    Come let us reason together...Isa.1:18
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    My new Blog site: God and Butterfly

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor
    This account is found only in Luke. There was a similar event narrated by John, but the mention of Jesus' feet is laconic:
    John 12:3 Then took Mary a pound of ointment of spikenard, very costly, and anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her hair: and the house was filled with the odour of the ointment.
    And that is that. No other details are given.

    Another interesting point to note, and I'm not sure the significance of it is that the account in John of the annointing of Jesus is a different event than the accounts in Matthew, and Mark. The Gospel of Luke does not record the account of either Matt. 26 or Mark 14 (where the head of Jesus is annointed), or the one in John 12 (where the feet of Jesus are annointed).

    The account of the annointing of Jesus before the Passover is missing in the Gospel of Luke.....what could that mean?

    God Bless

    Rose
    Never trust anything you are afraid to question ~

    To know oneself is to know the universe...


    Live Fully...Love Extravagantly...For the sake of Goodness

    Be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves. Matt.10:16

    Come let us reason together...Isa.1:18
    ********************************
    My new Blog site: God and Butterfly

  5. #5
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    hmm...speaking of feet: Luke talks about the treading of Jerusalem being trodden down by the Gentiles untile the times of the gentiles be fulfilled. Luke is the 42nd book (spoke 20) and then the beast treading down for 42 months in Revelation 13 I believe.

  6. #6
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    Elaborating more on the account in Luke of the anointing, I find it extremely interesting that the only account of Jesus being anointed by a woman in the Gospel of Luke focuses not only on "feet", but also on "head". First the head of the woman whose hair wiped Jesus feet, then Jesus admonishing the Pharisee, Simon for not anointing His head with oil.
    Luke 7:37 And, behold, a woman in the city, which was a sinner, when she knew that Jesus sat at meat in the Pharisee's house, brought an alabaster box of ointment, 38 And stood at his feet behind him weeping, and began to wash his feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment. 44 And he turned to the woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this woman? I entered into thine house, thou gavest me no water for my feet: but she hath washed my feet with tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head. 45 Thou gavest me no kiss: but this woman since the time I came in hath not ceased to kiss my feet. 46 My head with oil thou didst not anoint: but this woman hath anointed my feet with ointment. 47 Wherefore I say unto thee, Her sins, which are many, are forgiven; for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little.

    The reason this seems significant is because the Gospel of Luke, resides on Spoke 20, that is governed by the Hebrew letter "Resh", which means head.

    Very interesting.....

    Rose
    Never trust anything you are afraid to question ~

    To know oneself is to know the universe...


    Live Fully...Love Extravagantly...For the sake of Goodness

    Be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves. Matt.10:16

    Come let us reason together...Isa.1:18
    ********************************
    My new Blog site: God and Butterfly

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAM View Post
    Glory be to God who reveals such things to His children!

    I will comment more as time permits - but I must say that this article is extremely well done and profound. Thank you Victor.

    Richard

    PS: Reading your article gave me "Holy Goosebumps"!
    Glory be to the Son for His Revelation!

    Thank you Richard, these insights based on variations between the Gospels do give goosebumps!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rose View Post
    WOW!

    That is truly incredible! Last night Richard and I were just talking about how the Bible Wheel reveals connections in the Synoptic Gospels that would otherwise remain hidden, and we were speaking of all the connections that are probably still waiting to be discovered.....then guess what? You find this extremely significant connection with feet and the Gospel of Luke on the 20th Spoke, governed by the letter "Resh" which means "head". Linking together "feet" and "head" on the same Spoke.

    Rose
    What a great coincidence!

    You've posted excellent insights. I'll comment when I get a chance. Thank you!

  9. #9
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    Spoke 20: Treading down under foot

    Quote Originally Posted by gilgal View Post
    hmm...speaking of feet: Luke talks about the treading of Jerusalem being trodden down by the Gentiles untile the times of the gentiles be fulfilled. Luke is the 42nd book (spoke 20) and then the beast treading down for 42 months in Revelation 13 I believe.
    Yes! I'm glad you have noticed that! Here are the verses in consideration:
    Book 42 - Luk 21:24 And they shall fall by the edge of the sword, and shall be led away captive into all nations: and Jerusalem shall be trodden down of the Gentiles, until the times of the Gentiles be fulfilled.

    Rev 11:2 But the court which is without the temple leave out, and measure it not; for it is given unto the Gentiles: and the holy city shall they tread under foot forty and two months.
    Only Luke gives this detailed information in the Olivet Discourse about the times of the Gentiles. Luke is Book 42, and only in Revelation do we find that same language concerning Jerusalem: treading of the Gentiles for a definite time - we learn that it spans 42 months. It is a different kind of KeyLink - one between a number in the surface text and a book ordinal position in the canon - that we can often find in Scripture.

    This is the prophecy about the Jewish War that spanned about 42 months between 66-70 AD.

    It is noteworthy that this concept of "treading down" relates to feet and the Gospel of Luke, the Gospel of the Feet! The Greek word is Patheo. Thayer defines the word:
    1) to tread
    1a) to trample, crush with the feet
    1b) to advance by setting foot upon, tread upon: to encounter successfully the greatest perils from the machinations and persecutions with which Satan would fain thwart the preaching of the gospel
    1c) to tread under foot, trample on, i.e. to treat with insult and contempt: to desecrate the holy city by devastation and outrage
    In his definition he alludes to two Gospel passages. In 1c we refers to Luke 21:24 mentioned above. And in 1b, guess what?, he mentions another exclusive Lukan verse!
    Luk 10:19 Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.
    These are the only appearances of Patheo in the four Gospels! The word only reappears in Revelation.

    In Hebrew there are some Resh words used to describe the action of treading and trampling as an image of subjugation and rule! They are Radad (S#7286), Radah (S#7287) and Ramas (S#7429).

  10. #10
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    "He fell at his feet": Link between Book 41 (Mark) and Verse 41 of Luke 8

    I want to come back to the episode of Jairus. We compared the accounts of Matthew and Luke:
    Matthew 9:18 While he spake these things unto them, behold, there came a certain ruler, and worshipped him, saying, My daughter is even now dead: but come and lay thy hand upon her, and she shall live.

    Luk 8:41 And, behold, there came a man named Jairus, and he was a ruler of the synagogue: and he fell down at Jesus' feet, and besought him that he would come into his house.
    There’s an interesting additional element in this case that I deliberately left out. Note that the reference in Luke comes from verse 41, and Mark is Book 41. Curiously, in this case Mark just happens to add the mention of Jesus’ feet in his narrative!
    Book 41 - Mar 5:22 And, behold, there cometh one of the rulers of the synagogue, Jairus by name; and when he saw him, he fell at his feet.
    Amazing! There is a KeyLink between Book 41 and Verse 41 of Luke 8. One of the common word sets is (Jairus, feet). This is a secondary phenomenon based on Inner Cycles that may also be involved in the study of the Synoptic Problem and the structure of Scripture. I recently reported another case just like this one in the verse level of the structure. It concerns Luke's exclusive mention of "all the trees" in Luke 21:29.
    Last edited by Victor; 10-19-2009 at 04:45 PM. Reason: Added post title

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